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Pacification Of The Borders Historical Manuscripts Commission July 1605 – November 1642. 54 Pages Of Transcript

Pacification of The Borders Historical Manuscripts Commission July 1605 – November 1642. 54 pages of transcript

Text from the Historical Manuscripts Commission

A folio volume in a parchment cover, fastened with an ancient. clasp. It contains copies of letters and other documents relating to the Com¬mission appointed by James I. for the pacification and government of the borderland of his two kingdoms. They are all in one small, neat hand, and almost in chronological order. There is reason to believe that they were made for Joseph Pennington of Muncaster, one of the Commissioners, from originals in the possession of Sir Wilfred Lawson, the most active of his co1leagues, and the custodian of their papers. The name of Graham is generally given as Grayme, and Grey as Gray, but in the following calendar I have modernised these and most other proper names.

f.1. [February 25, 1605.] The King to Sir William Selby, Sir Robert Delaval, Sir Wilfred Lawson, Sir William Seaton, and Sir William Home, knights, Joseph Pennington, Edward Grey of Morpeth, Patrick Chirmeside of East Nisbit, John Charteris (Chartrows) of Amesfield, and Gideon Murray of Elibank, esquires. Commission for the speedy suppressing of offenders in the counties of Northumberland, Westmore¬land and Cumberland, and in the shires and parishes of Norham, the Holy Island, and Bedlington, parcel of the county palatine of Durham, and in the shiredoms and towns of Berwick, Roxburgh, Selkirk, Peebles, Dumfries, and in the stewardries of Kircudbright and Annerdale. (Printed in Rymer’s “Foedera.”)

f.2. February 25, 1605. The King to Edmund, Lord Sheffield, President of the Council in the North, and to his two justices of assize in the counties of Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, and to Sir Thomas Hesketh, Attorney of the Court of Wards and Liveries, Sir William Selby Sir Robert Delaval, Sir Wilfred Lawson, Joseph Pennington, and Edward Grey of Morpeth. Commission of oyer and terminer. (Latin.)

February 14, 1604 [-5]. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners appointed for the government of the late borders. Instruc¬tions as to the execution of the commission. Those malefactors of the surname of Graham who have been received to their submission are not to be meddled with for any offences committed before their submissions. Persons under bail to appear at the gaol delivery are to be left for trial there. All persons living within the bounds of the commission, or in certain other specified districts, are to be forbidden the use of all manner of armour and weapons, and of horses, “savinge meane naggs for their tillage,” excepting noble men and gentlemen and their house¬hold servants. The evidence of a Scotsman against an Englishman, and of an Englishman against a Scotsman is to be received.

f.3. N.D. The King to the Commissioners. Instructions as to the execution of the Commission. One of the English side is to be commander of the rest for the first three months, and then one of the Scottish side for three months and so afterwards alternately. All deadly feuds are to be suppressed. Fugitives from one country to the other are to be delivered to the ordinary officer on demand. All idle vagabonds are to be expelled from the bounds of the commission. All in whom there can be expected no hope of amendment may be removed to some other place, “where the change of aire will make in them an exchange of their manners.” The armour “which hath served the broken people within those bonds in their lewd actions may be taken from them.” A certificate of proceedings is to be sent to the Council of both kingdoms every two months, or oftener.

f.4. February 23, 1604 [-5]. Whitehall. The Council to the Com¬missioners appointed on the English side. Order to meet at Carlisle “on the Monday seavnnight after Easter daye next” at latest.

f. 5. April 9, 1605. Carlisle. Articles agreed upon by the Com¬missioners. (Printed in Nicolson and Burn’s “History of Westmorland and Cumberland,” vol. i., p. cxxvii.)

f. 6. February 2, 1604 [-5]. Verbal instructions delivered to the Commissioners by Viscount Cranborne at the Council Table. “After we had received the names of such as had submitted themselves, we should after our returne, consider of 150 of them fytt for his majestee’s service, and by sendinge away of whome the countrie might be best eased.”

February 23, 1604 [-5]. Verbal instructions delivered to the Com¬missioners by the Lord Chancellor at York House, as to outlawries and pardons.

March 23, 1605. Edinburgh. Alexander Dunfermeling, Lord Chan¬cellor of Scotland, to Sir Wilfred Lawson. Letter accompanying the Commission, sealed with the Great Seal of both kingdoms.

April 17, 1605. Dumfries. The Commissioners to the Council. We met at Carlisle on the 6th inst., and summoned all the Grahams who were bound for themselves and their followers. Whereas two of every branch were bound, we have ordered that six of the principal of every branch shall be bound for themselves and their followers, and that each of these six shall find two sureties. We have made orders “for the better government of the broken people of either countrie,” subject to reform by the Council. We send a list of one hundred and fifty Grahams who have submitted themselves, and whom we think most fit to be sent away. Many of the said Grahams appear to be poor labourers and undertenants to the rest. Many complaints are made by English and Scots alike about offences made before the death of the late Queen.

f. 7. “The copie of the names of the Graymes which are to be sent away.” One hundred and forty-nine names are given. Among them are :—1, William Graham of Mote; 2, Arthur Graham, his brother; 3, Richard Graham, son to Walter of Netherby; 4, Richard Graham, alias Jocks Ritchee; 6, John Graham, alias All our Eames; 7, Hutchin Graham, alias Young Hutchin; 13, George (sic) Graham, alias Geordies Sandie; 15, Richard Graham, alias Long Ritchee; 67, Thomas Graham of Easton, alias Ritchies Wills Thom.

f. 8. April 17, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. Since our departure from you today, we have learned that the leaving out of Richard Graham, son of Walter Graham of Netherby, is so evil taken, that we shall be taxed of partiality. We wish there¬fore to add his name to the list. We desire also to have all the different branches of the Grahams before us, face to face, so that we may see which are most fit to be sent away.

f. 9. April 18, 1605. Dumfries. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. Concerning Richard Graham of Netherby, and the offence against John Skelton.

April 26, 1605. Greenwich. The Council to the Commissioners. They forbid them to punish persons for actions done by virtue of warrants from the Earl of Cumberland, who deserves well of the King.

April 29, 1605. The Court. The Earl of Cumberland to the English Commissioners. Encloses a copy of the King’s warrant.

f.10 June 22, 1604. Greenwich. The King to the Earl of Cum¬berland. Warrant to stay the prosecution of those who, on the King’s first entry into England, had in rebellious manner disturbed the peace and spoiled many persons, but who were known not to have been male-factors before that time.

May 6,1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Cumberland. Concerning their proceedings against Hetherington and John Musgrave.

f. 11. May 4, 1605. Greenwich. The Council to the English Com¬missioners. Order for the postponement of the trial of Robert Wallis of Hamilton on a capital charge.

May 6, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to Viscount Cranborne. At the gaol delivery at Carlisle, four persons have been condemned and executed for murder, and one for horse-stealing.

May 6,1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Council. The country is at present peaceable, and not much infested with murder or theft.

May 12, 1605. Newcastle. The same to the same. At the gaol delivery for Northumberland, six persons have been condemned for horse-stealing and other felonies. We do our best to encourage true men to complain of such as have committed felonies.

f. 12. May 17, 1605. Greenwich. The Council to the English Commissioners, in reply to the letter dated at Dumfries on the 17th of April. The King’s clemency towards the Grahams who have submitted themselves has been shewn in pardoning their lives, and furthermore in disposing of them so that they shall be in no worse condition than his other good subjects who were not offenders, being appointed to be sent to serve in the garrisons and cautionary towns of Flushing and Brill, places where many honest men desire to be maintained in service. You are to appoint two very discreet persons to conduct them to New¬castle by the last day of June, whence one hundred will be conveyed to Flushing, and fifty to Brill. For the charges of their journey to New¬castle, we require you to provide as much money as will serve them at the rate of 8d. a day to every man, and 4s. a day for each of the conductors, and the money so disbursed by you will be repaid out of the Exchequer.

Same day and place. The same to the same. It has been no pleasing information to his Majesty, and evil news to us, to hear of the escape of twenty-eight or twenty-nine prisoners from the prison at Carlisle. It seems strange that you have not told us what has become of them, or what course has been taken for the recovery of them.

f. 13. April 7, 1605. Carlisle. Sir. W. Lawson to Viscount Cran¬borne. Having heard that the prisoners condemned when the Earl of Cumberland was his Majesty’s Lieutenant here had broken the prison on Wednesday last at night, I have repaired to Carlisle, where I find that twenty-nine out of thirty-three have escaped. Enclosed is a list of their names. Eight are Scots, who have gone to Scotland; the rest are Englishmen, of whom nine or ten should have been met yesterday between Penrith and Appleby, travelling southwards.

“The names of the prisoners that made an escape forth of Carliell Castle.” Seven bear the name of Armstrong, and five that of Graham.

April 27 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir J. Charteris. Con¬cerning the escape of the eight Scotsmen from the Castle.

f. 14. April 29 (“ this penult of Aprill “), 1605. Dumfries. Sir J. Charteris to Sir W. Lawson. I have spoken to Lord Maxwell, who is steward of the country, and master of most of the Scotsmen, so that none of them should be “resett” or “have any supplement” within his Lordship’s bounds, urging him to send his baily to take up their houses and remove their wives and families. The countries must be charged to rise and assist the garrisons.

June 2, 1605. Berwick. The English Commissioners to the Council. Two of the escaped prisoners, Matthew Graham and Richard Black¬burne, have been apprehended. It will be difficult to get men of some quality as conductors of the Grahams for 4s. a day.

f.15. Same day and place. The Commissioners to the Council. Wc have taken order that Sir Henry Leigh and Sir William Cranston, with the horsemen in his Majesty’s pay under their charge, shall go to the west parts, to search for the condemned prisoners who have escaped from Carlisle, and, if they have taken the woods, to demolish their houses and expel their families, and to apprehend their “aiders and comforters.” Forty horsemen have been enrolled for this service.

June 3, 1605. Berwick. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. Confirms his letter of April 27.

June 2, 1605. Greenwich. The Council to the English Commis¬sioners. Each of the two conductors of the Grahams is to have 6s. a day instead of 4s., and each may have a lieutenant with an allowance of 4s. a day. Whosoever of the men appointed to go to the cautionary towns shall run away, must expect to be punished with death.

f.16. June 13, 1605. Berwick. Thomas Parkinson, Mayor of Berwick, to the Commissioners. “I caused a drume to warne all the ould servitors, such as were or had been officers, to meet togither in the parado, where I read and shewed your letter.” William Breddiman, gentleman, sometime under-marshal, and William Nodder, gentleman, late officer to Sir John Skinner, offered themselves to be leaders, and William Lambe, late officer to Captain Bowyer, offered himself to be lieutenant. These arc approved by general opinion of all. They will not fail to be at Carlisle on the 18th. They pray that they may be well paid, and desire to have allowance for two drums.

June 27, 1605. Edinburgh. Sir William Cranston to the English Commissioners. I have burned all the houses on the Scottish side, at Staykhue.

June 29, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. We have denounced seven of the principal men of the hundred-and-fifty Grahams as fugitives, and we pray you to take order for their apprehension.

f. 17. Same day and place. The same to Sir William Cranston. Order to repair to Carlisle with all speed.

“The names of the principall Graymes that made default. 1. Hutchin Graime alias Young Hutchin,” and six others.
June 29, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. We send a copy of his Majesty’s warrant delivered to us by Hutchin Graham. We have answered him that he should have what in duty and reason thereunto appertained, but he, giving it out to be a warrant to free him and all his clan from going over to Flushing or Brill, absents himself and sets a lewd example to others.

May 13, 1605. Greenwich. The King to the Commissioners. War¬rant to spare the lives of Hutchin Graham and other malefactors who were in the field when Sanders Ringell Armstrong was taken, and to whom, for that service, pardon was promised.

June 29, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Governor of Brill, or his deputy. We have received orders from the Council for sending away fifty of the Grahams to Brill, under a sufficient con¬ductor and lieutenant., who are thence to return. We have chosen Thomas Carleton as conductor, and William Lambe as lieutenant. They have spent long time in the wars, and being now desirous to serve his Majesty, we commend them to you for employment.

June 28, 1605. Carlisle. The same to the Mayor of Newcastle. We should have sent one hundred and fifty of the Grahams by the last of the month, but their appearance has been so slack that we can send only fifty, who are to be shipped to Brill. ‘We hope to send one hundred for Flushing within four clays.

f.18. June 30, 1605. Carlisle. The same to the Earl of Salisbury.

Same day and place. The same to the Council. Three of the escaped prisoners have voluntarily submitted themselves to prison, where they now remain with the four that fled not and the two that were formerly apprehended. At present the woods yield some relief to the others. We summoned the bondmen to appear on the 21st inst., then again on the 25th, and again on the 28th, but there appeared only eighty-five. We have therefore sent fifty to Brill, and delivered the others to their conductor, William Breddiman, and his lieutenant, William Nodder. We have caused Hutchin Graham and seven others to be denounced as fugitives. He is a man generally evil thought of here. We marvel at the absence of Sir William Selby from this ser¬vice, and of the ten men in his Majesty’s pay who are with him.

f.19. List of the fifty Grahams sent to Brill.

f.20. The fifty Grahams sent to Brill to the English Commissioners. Many of us who were true men confessed ourselves offenders. by reason of the Earl of Cumberland’s promise that provision should be made for our wives and children, nearly a thousand in number, as good as that which we had upon Esk. We therefore pray for the fulfilment of this promise. We could in a month raise three hundred able men to serve his Majesty under our own leaders. We are willing to go to the mouth of the cannon, to the block, or to the gibbet, to show our loyalty.

f.21. The same to the King. Petition to the same effect.

May 13, 1605. Greenwich. The King to the Commissioners. Warrant as before.
f.22. June 26, 1605. Skipton. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson. Encloses a letter from the Council dated June 1, 1605

June 1, 1605. Greenwich. The Council to the Earl of Cumberland I Complaint has been made to us by William Wicklyffe, servant to the Earl of Northumberland. of an attack rnade on him and the Earl’s audlitor and others travelling along the borders, by certain persons who robbed them, and carried him to prison, lie says that there are certain persons, chargeable with offences of their own, who can make proof against Roger Witherington and Randell Fenwick in this matter. They are to receive assurance for coming and going in.

July 1, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Cumberland. David of the Bankhead has come in and humbled himself to his Majesty, and it is thought that Hutchin and others will do likewise to-day.

f.23. June 25, 1605. The Earl of Montrose to the English commissioners. Although you have determined to transport certain of my cousins to Newcastle on Saturday night, there to remain in ward, I entreat you to permit Richard Graham, son of Walter of Netherby, to remain with me. I will be answerable for him to the King, to the Council, and to you.

June 30, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Montrose. We may in no way alter the list of those who are to be sent over to the Low Countries, and the name of Richard Graham is on the list sent to us by the Privy Council of England.

July 4,1605. Newcastle. Thomas Riddell, Mayor of Newcastle, to the English Commissioners. I pray you to give me certain warning of the coming of the hundred men, otherwise I shall be forced either to stay a ship, or to stay them, at the King’s charge.

July 6, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Governor of Flushing. As we cannot get the whole number of a hundred Grahams, we send seventy-two under the charge of William Breddiman and William Nodder.

[July 6, 1605.] Testimonial of the English Commissioners that David Graham of the Bankhead, appointed to go to Flushing with others, differs from most of the rest of his surname in that generally he has not been accounted a thief or a resetter of thieves, but a man of more civil government and behaviour than most of the rest.

f 24. July 6, 1605. Carlisle. Testimonial of the same that Richard Graham, appointed to go to Flushing, is the eldest son of Walter Graham of Netherby, the chief of all the Grahams dwelling between Leven and Sarke, who should receive such favour as to his “demerit” shall appertain.

July 7, 1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. We have sent seventy-two Grahams to Newcastle. Hutchin Graham of the Gards and John Graham, alias Jock of the Pear-tree, have much hindered this service, and their offence ought not to be passed over.

Same day and place. The same to the Council. We have sent seventy-two Grahams to Newcastle, with 2s. apiece for three days, 71. 4s., and 191. for their conductors. Of the seven principal Grahams whom we denounced as fugitives four have submitted themselves, and have gone with the others, viz., Richard Graham, son of Waiter of Netherby, David Graham of the Bankhead, Alexander Graham of Kirkanders, alias Geordies Sandie, and Hutchin Graham of Roweliffe. Hutchin Graham of Gards still gives out that he has a free pardon for himself and all his, whereas the King’s warrant applies to five only, of whom two dwell in Scotland, one has been hanged, and one has willingly gone to Flushing. Jock of the Pear-tree is the other. We have expelled the families and uncovered the houses of those who still stand out. There are persons of other surnames whose lives have been no better than those of the Grahams.
23.List of fifty-four Grahams named in the schedule and sent to
Flushing.

f. 26. List of eighteen Grahams, sent to Flushing in place of others named in the schedule, who are dead, sick, or hurt, or otherwise unable to go.
List of twenty Grahams, named in the schedule, who are unable to go, with the causes of their unfitness.

f. 27. List of nineteen Grahams who have not appeared.

List of six Grahams, who were named twice in the schedule.

July 6,1605. Skipton. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson. Comments on his proceedings.

July 11, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Cumberland. In defence of his proceedings.

f. 28.July 14, 1605. Skipton. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson. Expresses satisfaction.

July 18, 1605. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson. Enclose a letter from the Earl of Northampton, and ask for his advice in the matter.

f. 29. July 10, 1605. Whitehall. The Earl of Northampton to the English Commissioners. Enquires as to the truth of the petition of George Graham and William Graham, alias Rosetrees the younger, who say that they have not been guilty of any crimes. Petition, etc., enclosed.

July 20, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir H. Delaval and E. Grey. If the two Grahams mentioned in the Earl of Northampton’s letter arc not already gone to Brill, they may be respited; otherwise enquiry must be made as to their behaviour, especially during what is called “the busie weeke.”

f. 30.August 4, 1603. Haddington. [Sir Williain Senton] to the English Commissioners. Invites them to send one or two of their number to Hawick on the 26th inst. to be present at the trials.

August 6, 1605. Same Place. The same to Sir W. Lawson. Sir W. Selby or Sir W. Lawson would be the fittest to attend at Hawick. The English Commissioners must inform Sir William Cranston, before the 20th inst., of the person or persons selected, and of the number of the train, because the commodity of lodging is much worse at Hawick than at Dumfries.

f. 31. August 14, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir William Cranston. We have been expecting to hear from you and to receive some of those who broke his Majesty’s castle, and some of the fugitive Grahams, who, we hear, go about openly at Edlinburgh and elsewhere.

August 8,1605. Newcastle. Sir W. Selby, Sir H. Delaval, and E. Grey, to Sir W. Lawson. The commissions of oyer and terminer for England and Scotland are distinct, and it appears to us that we have nothing to do with the meeting of the Scottish Commissioners at Hawick.

June 27, 1605. Westminster. The King to the English Commis¬sioners. Warrant for a certificate concerning forfeited recognisances.

August 20, 1605. Grafton. The Earl of Northampton to the English Commissioners. Sir Henry Leigh has asked for the escheats of the R’S goods of fugitives and their abettors, with the benefit of all forfeited recognisances, on the English side, in order to enable him to bear the burden of his service. The King, however, will not grant his suit until
he has heard your opinion in the matter.

f. 32. April 30, 1605. Normanby. Lord Sheffield to the Commis¬sioners. Warrant for the apprehension of Nicholas Musgrave and others, for assault upon one Thomas Lancaster.

July 13, 1605. York. The same to the same. Encloses and supports a petition from Hugh Carliel of Birtley.

N.D. Hugh Carliel of Birtley to Lord Sheffield, Lord President of the North. Petition for the apprehension of Thomas Rotherforth of Rochester, John Rotherfortli, alias John the Galliard, and seven others, notorious offenders, who cut off the petitioner’s left hand. He has been striving for nine or ten years to have them apprehended, although they go publicly abroad.

f. 33. August 31, 1005. Seaton Delaval. Sir U. Delaval and E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Sir William Selby alleges that his men are too busy to apprehend the persons named in the Lord President’s letter. The Sheriff of Northumberland is absent, and very busy about his Majesty’s affairs, touching recusants, etc. Give direc¬tions to Sir Henry Leigh to apprehend them, and subscribe our names. We perceive that Sir W. Selby will keep his men to himself, and will not be at our directions. There are nightly divers stealths in this country, and they are likely to increase. It is desirable to write to the Council for authority to send away persons of bad disposition for the King’s service abroad.

September 7, 1605. IselI. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Supports the suit of Sir Henry Leigh to the King.

September 1, 1605. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to Sir W. Lawson. I send the articles concluded at Hawick. There was a somewhat vehement disputation. The Commissioners of Scotland “made no bones” to kill such fugitives or felons as made resistance. I was not of that opinion concerning those that should be taken on our side. Give Sir Henry Leigh your opinion in the matter. He is very discreet, but he relics much on your judgment.

August 28, 1605. Hawick. Articles agreed upon by the Commis¬sioners, concerning the prosecution of suits between Englishmen and Scots.

f. 34. September 7, 1605. IseIl. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby. Concerning forfeited recognisances.

September 7, 1605. Same place. The same to Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the apprehension of offenders in Northumber¬land.

September 13, 1605. Carlisle. The same to the Scottish Cornmis¬sioners Common report says that the Armstrongs of Kinmouth, [?Kinmont Willie ?] who were the principal prisoners who escaped from Carlisle Castle, remain quietly at their houses and that Hutchin Graham with his followers, who were the chief causers of the disobedience of the Grahams, go openly up and down, in Scotland. This is a hindrance to the King’s service, and a pernicious example. Postscript. Four of the Grahams who were sent to Flushing (whose names are given) have returned without licence and fled to Scotland. Pray give order that they may be apprehended.

f. 35. September 14, 1605. Isell. The same to Sir Henry Leigh. Concerning the wife of Ritchies Geordie.

September 17, 1605. Dumfries. Lord Amesfield to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning a horse bought at the last fair at Carlisle by a gentleman of Scptland, William Glendynninge (Glendon).

July 19, 1905. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners. Order enquiry into the petition of Mungo Ribton.

f. 36. ND. Mungo Ribton of Cockermouth to the King. As he was travelling in Gillesland, co. Cumberland, with William Wickliffe, esq., arid William Stockdale, upon the affairs of the Earl of Northumberland, they were beset by a company of barbarous people, who spoiled them of horses, money, and apparel, to the value of 200l, and carried away Wickliffe and Ribton into Scotland as prisoners, and ransomed them, to the overthrow of their estates and families. They also spoiled Stockdale of all that he had, to the value of 100 marks. The petitioner prosecuted the matter at Carlisle, but no punishment has been inflicted upon the offenders, or recompense on him. He prays for the appre¬hension of the said offenders, and of one of the chief of them, Geoffrey Carleton, who remains near London.

September 20 [16051 Lord Applegarth to Sir W. Lawson. Concern¬ing a horse.

September 17 [1605]. Dumfries. William Glendynninge to Lord Applegarth. Concerning the same.

September 26 [1605]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Lord Applegarth. Concerning the same.

September 26, 1605. Same place. The same to Sir J. Charteris. Concerning the same.

f. 37. September 7, 1605. Appleby Castle. William Hutton, Chris¬topher Pickeringe, Gerard Lowther, and five others, constables of the Earl of Cumberland in the forest of Nichol, and the parish of Arthuret, co. Cumberland, to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Desire to be sworn as constables, and to be allowed to bear arms.

September 27, 1605. Morpeth. E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson. In support of Sir Henry Leigh’s suit to the King.

September 6, 16O5. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to Sir W. Lawson, J. Pennington, and E. Grey. In support of the same.

f. 38. [September, 1605.] Sir W. Selby’s opinion concerning the same.

October 6, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby. Con¬cerning forfeited recognisances.

October 7, 1605. Same place. The same and J. Pennington to Sir W. Selby, Sir H. Delaval, and E. Grey. Many of the Grahams have returned, and daily return. We will commit such of them as have returned without warrant, until the pleasure of the Council be known. None of the nineteen fugitives, or of the Armstrongs of Kynemouth, have been brought in, although several letters have been sent to the Scottish Commissioners, and to Sir William Cranston. We send you a draft of an answer to the Earl of Northampton concerning Sir Henry Leigh’s suit. Postscript:—By Sir H. Leigh’s means, Hutchin Graham has submitted himself to his Majesty’s mercy. We have committed him prisoner to Carlisle Castle.

f. 39. October 7, 1605. Same place. The same to the Council. About twenty-four of the Grahams who were sent to Flushing have returned, and it is said that as many more have landed in divers parts, and they are daily expected here. Some have licences of divers sorts, as some to return within two months, etc. We have issued a warrant to Sir H. Leigh for the apprehension of such as have returned without licence. The better sort much mislike the return of the Grahams. There is some stealing here, and it is likely to increase by reason of the return of these Grahams. Sir H. Leigh has done good service with regard to Hutchin Graham.

October 8, 1605. Same place. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salis¬bury. Being one of the Knights of the Shire for the county of Cum¬berland, and also one of the Commissioners for the middle shires of Great Britain, I desire to know whether it is the King’s pleasure that I should come up to serve at the Parliament, or remain here.

f. 40. October 7, 1605. Same place. The same to the Earl of Northumberland to the same effect.

List of nineteen Grahams returned from Flushing with and without licence.

October 7, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington to Sir H. Leigh, Provost Marshal at Carlisle. Warrants for the apprehen¬sion of such Grahams as have returned without licence, and for the detention of Hutchin Graham.

f. 41. October 15, 1605. The Duchy House. The Earl of Cumber¬land to Sir W. Lawson. I had some conference yesterday with the Earls of Suffolk and Salisbury, and they resolved that it was fit that you should come up to the Parliament, and thus acquaint their lord-ships with your proceedings.

October 23, 1605. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Northampton. They endorse the opinion of Sir W. Selby concerning the suit of Sir H. Leigh.

October 23, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Cumber¬land. I am troubled with an infirmity in my leg and unable to undergo a long journey. We have appointed a gaol delivery at Carlisle on the 6th of November, and another at Newcastle on the 11th. I therefore crave that my absence may be pardoned. Otherwise on further adver¬tisement I shall perform the commands given to me to the uttermost ot my power, if I can travel but ten miles a day. More of the Grahams are returning daily. If some order be not taken, they will all be shortly at home again.

f. 42. Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Salisbury. To the same effect.

October 24, 1605. Same place. The same to the same. By the negligence of the gaoler’s servants, who left the door open when they brought in the prisoners’ supper, five notable thieves escaped out of the gaol here last night, of whom one only has been taken again. There remain eight to be tried at the next gaol delivery. This is the third time that prisoners have escaped since the present sheriff entered office.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and B. Grey. To the same effect. The Scottish Commissioners have been invited to attend the gaol deliveries.

f. 43. Same day and plane. The same to the Scottish Commis¬sioners. Demands the apprehension of certain persons, and invites the Commissioners to attend the gaol deliveries, to see justice indifferently ministered. Two of the prisoners who have escaped from Carlisle are Scotsmen.

October 19, 1605. Whitehall. The Council to the English Commis¬sioners. His Majesty has been acquainted with your care and diligence in sifting out the manner and means of the return of the Grahams from service in the Low Countries. His pleasure is that all who have come with a pass shall be sent back to Newcastle to be there embarked and returned to the captain under whom they served. We have written to the Mayor of Newcastle and to Viscount Lisle, Governor of Flushing. It has been usual to grant leave of absence for two months to ordinary soldiers, and the Governor and his deputy did not know that the men sent over from your parts were destined to remain beyond the seas without returning. You are to proceed according to justine against those who have returned without hence concerning their former offences, and keep them in prison until his Majesty’s pleasure is known. The passports subscribed by the name of Philip Thormington are counterfeit, for he is not captain of any company in those parts. Sir H. Leigh has done acceptable service in procuring the submission of Hutchin Graham, who is to be detained in Carlisle Castle until further directions. When these orders have been obeyed, Sir W. Lawson is to repair to Parliament.

f. 44. October 14, 1605. The Court at Hinchingbrook (?). The Duke of Lenox to the English Commissioners. The King has promised to give leave to young William Graham, alias Rosetrees, to return from Brill, upon your certificate of his honesty and good behaviour, which pray send by the bearer, who will wait for it.

September 28, 1605. Hampton Court. Sir Roger Wilbraham to the same. On behalf of George Graham of Burnefoote, who has shewed his loyalty in apprehending one Sander Rynion; a rebellious malefactor. You have threatened to press him for service in the Low Countries. He is lame and impotent, and he has the charge of a wife and twelve children.

May 23, 1605. Warrant from the Earl of Cumberland to stay pro¬ceedings against William Taylor for a burglary said to have been com¬mitted thirteen years since. He has been employed in his Majesty’s service and has deserved well therein, especially in the taking of Robert Sandie, a notable thief and murderer, who was at the murder of Sir John Carmichael. Taylor had a promise of mercy from the Bishop of Carlisle and Sir Charles Hailes.

October 13, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning the gaol deliveries.

f. 45. October 28, 1605. Whitehall. The Earl of Salisbury to Sir W. Lawson. Considering your infirmity, the King is not strict in the matter of your coming up at the time of the Parliament, and he refers it to your own discretion.

November 14, 1605. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to the Council. Some of the Grahams have been apprehended at New¬castle. We have proceeded against two for leaving the King’s service. The prisoners here say that of the seventy-two sent to Flushing there are at most fourteen remaining there. Sir H. Leigh has had no great success in apprehending them. He alleges that they flee into Scotland. Hutchin Graham’s example has not been followed. Four notable thieves were executed at the gaol delivery at Carlisle, and ten at New¬castle. The King’s pardon to particular malefactors encourages others. In our opinion the provinces within our commission ought to be exempted from any general pardon by special proviso. English male-factors are received in Scotland, especially in the west.

f. 46. November 14, 1605. Same place. The same to Sir Roger Wilbraham. George Graham of Burnfoote did not any service to the King on the borders in the apprehension of Sandie Rynion. When all the Grahams were commanded to come before us at Carlisle he stood out and caused his sureties, two honest men, to forfeit a thousand
pound bond, to their utter undoing. He stands outlawed of felony, and, as we are informed, he was in “the ill weeke” at the spoiling of Orton, the burning of Richard Johnson’s house, and the spoiling of Little Orton, in the first year of his Majesty’s reign.

f.47. November 12, 1605. Same place. Sir W. Selby and Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. On Sunday, the 10th instant, on our way from Carlisle to Newcastle, we first heard of the horrible and grace¬ less conspiracy against the King and the whole state. Knowing that William Ord, a pensioner of 20d. per diem in Berwick, had the keeping of the Earl of Northumberland’s castle of Prudhoe (having been pre¬ferred to that place by Thomas Percy the traitor) and had become a recusant, we thought good to search the said castle, before going to Newcastle. We found none there except servants. Ord had left on the previous day. He was as likely as any to conceal the said Percy. There is not a more suspicious place in this country. We only learned that Percy was there a fortnight before.

November 12, 1605. [Newcastle.] The English Commissioners to the same. The postmaster of this place has received a packet from George Whithead, captain for the Earl of Northumberland in the castle of Tynemouth. After some conference, we have thought it our duty to send it to you, so that if the said Earl he in his Majesty’s good favour it may be delivered to him, otherwise that it may be disposed of as shall seem best to you.

November 14, 1605. Newcastle. Sir W. Lawson to the same. I have heard of a warrant directed to Sir Henry Widdrington by the Lords of the Council, authorising him to take into his hands the castles of Alnwick, Tynemouth, and Cockermouth, in the county of Northumberland, as being in the custody of Thomas Percy the traitor, or of his adherents. The matter for Cockermouth is mistaken. It is in the south-western part of Cumberland, nearly forty miles from any part of Northumberland, and in my custody, who, I trust, shall never be so far destitute of God’s grace as to become an adherent of that vile traitor. The castle itself is for the most part ruinous. My wife’s son dwells in the gate-house, by my direction. About fourteen years since, the Earl of Northumberland made me Lieutenant of the Honour of Cockermouth, with a fee of 101. With this office I have the keeping of the castle, which is situate within two miles of my house. The dispossessing me .of this castle, which is of small moment either for offence or defence, Will breed in the heads of the people an opinion that some suspicion is held of my loyalty, and dis¬grace me in the government of these parts.

f. 48. Same day and place. The same to Sir Vincent Skinner. I pray you send by the bearer 501. for my allowance of 100 marks per annum, which began on the 11th of February, as by his Majesty’s privy seal will appear.

November 14, 1605. Same place. The English Commissioners to [the Earl of Salisbury ?] Demand for 281. 4s. laid out by them in the conveyance of fifty Grahams to Brill, and seventy-two to Flushing.

November 15, 1605. Gunnerton. Sir Henry Widdrington to Sir W. Lawson. I cannot meet you at Carlisle according to promise. I desire you to make known to the Sheriff of the county and the justices of the peace, such matters as I have made you already acquainted with, for the apprehending of the persons named in the proclamation. As you are interested in Cockermouth Castle, I doubt not that you will have due regard thereof until I may be with you.

November 15, 1605. Carlisle. The justices of the peace of Cumber¬land and Westmoreland to the Council. These counties are quiet, and there is no likelihood that the traitor Thomas Percy, or any of his adherents, can work any tumult or trouble there.

f. 49. November 16, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. Since Thomas Percy became a Papist, he has not cared to converse but with men of his own quality, and others of a better religion have not been desirous to have much to do with him. He has not commonly resorted hither, save at the times of the Earl of Northumber-land’s audit. The Grahams are in hopes of a pardon at the end of this Parliament. I was hardly able to undergo the journey from Newcastle to Carlisle yesterday.

Same day and place. The same and J. Pennington to Sir William Cranston, Provost Marshal and Commander of the horsemen in his Majesty’s pay. On behalf of the poor men of Rawniock. We have received no answer from you concerning the fugitives and the breakers of the castle at Carlisle.

November 15, 1605. Same place. The same to the keeper of the gaol at Carlisle. Warrant to detain malefactors apprehended by Sir H. Leigh.

f. 50. November 16, 1605. Same place. Sir W. Lawson to Chris¬topher Irton. You will do well to send away your wife and children, and to remain at Cockermouth Castle until the coming of Sir Henry Widdrington, who will put you forth and put others in. You must obey the warrant from the Lords of the Council.

November 15, 1605. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. Concerning the time of a gaol delivery.

N.D. The Earl of Northumberland to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning his stay in the north.

November 23, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Concerning the letter from the Scottish Com¬missioners.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Selby. I wish that the Grahams who have returned might be apprehended, so that might they be proceeded against before the meeting of Parliament on the 21st of January. I would gladly go if able to travel.

f. 51. November 23, 1605. Langley. Sir Henry Widdrington to Sir W. Lawson. I am sending my cousin, Mr. Carnobey, to enter Cockermouth Castle for his Majesty’s use, and to place such persons there as he shall think fit.

November 24, 1605. Bothel. The same to the same. I have received letters from the Council desiring that I should forbear to seize or enter Cockermouth Castle, and that it should continue in your keeping. You know that I have not been forward or hasty in this matter.

November 19; 1605. Whitehall. The Council to same. We were misinformed concerning Cockermouth. We would not prejudice your reputation, for we know your good service.

December 4, 1605. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to the same. Concerning the gaol delivery. I have apprehended many prisoners, so I that I hope there will be a good bar at Newcastle. My horses are spoiled with over much riding. Stealing is very much abated in this quarter.

December 4, 1605. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to the same. Concerning the gaol deliveries at Carlisle and Newcastle.

f. 52. December 5, 1605. Barmore. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. Invitation to a gaol delivery at Carlisle on the 13th of January. The Lords of the Council say that the King is highly offended with the return of the Grahams from Flushing and Brill. Sir H. Leigh affirms that he has cleared the border of England, and that they are received in Scotland. You may safely account all English Grahams in Scotland to be of this number. We also desire the apprehension of the prisoners from Carlisle Castle and other fugitives.

December 10, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby. Con¬cerning the gaol delivery, etc.

December 10, 1605. Same place. The same to Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

f. 53. December 4, 1605. Hollows. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson. On behalf of William Urwen, alias Kange, who has been indicted for an old offence.

December 10, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Cranston. Concerning William Urwen’s case. Demand for the apprehension of fugitives from England.

December 11, 1605. Cavers. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson and 3. Pennington. – I am as careful as any in advancing his Majesty’s service.

December 25, 1605. Peebles. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. The nearest farmships on your side should be carefully “re¬searched,” for we are informed that the fugitives have their main¬tenance there, dreading our side more than their own. Our country is so desolate, that you had but little contentment in remaining with us. Three or four of us with Sir W. Cranston will attend your gaol delivery on the 13th of January. –

f. 54. December 31, 1605. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. There has not been much stealing, and there would be less if the fugitives were once apprehended. I hear that about twenty of the Grahame from Brill have lately landed at Leith. Mr. Pearson returned on Christmas eve. He says that he could get no money [from the Treasury], unless he stayed ten days longer.

January 1, 1605 [-6]. Same place. The same to Mr. Pailler, Clerk of Assise .in the northern circuit. Asks for the indictments against the Grahams.

December 31, 1605. The same to William Marton, Thomas Carleton, and George Crookbane. Concerning the apprehension of the Grahams.

December 20, 1605. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson. God has called my Lord my brother out of this vale of misery, and you have lost an honourable friend. My brother passed an estate in Cumberland to the Earl of Salisbury, myself, and others. The King has granted Carlisle Castle to me for my life and the life of my son, which you know my brother wished.

f. 55. December 16, 1605. Lodging in King Street. The Bishop of Carlisle to tbe same. I send a copy of the King’s speech in the beginning of the Parliament. I took great comfort to hear of the good justice done at the late gaol deliveries at Carlisle and Newcastle. Con¬stancy in such proceedings will, I trust, bring a blessing of peace and truth to that poor country. I hope that you will come here a few days before the 21st of January.

January 13, 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. Few or none of the Grahams have been apprehended since the 14th of November, although many more have returned, to the terror of the better sort here. If the Grahams were not, these parts would be as free from blood and theft as Yorkshire. As their business is not settled in any good sort, I pray for directions about going or stay¬ing. I am somewhat better, but I wish to be spared from so long a journey. I cannot offer sufficient thanks for your favour concerning Cockermouth Castle.

Same day and place. The same to Mr. [John] Taylor. I condole with you the loss of so great a friend as your master, the Earl [of Cumberland]. It is fitter for me to stay in the country than to travel to London. If the Earl of Salisbury think fit that I should undergo the office of Sheriff for this year, I shall do my best to discharge the same, although I have no great reason to desire it.

January 17, 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. Certificate of pardon to Rynion Nixon for receiving an outlaw into his house.

f. 56. April 26, 1605. York. Sir Charles Hailes to the English Commissioners. Concerning the imprisonment of John Hilton.

May 4,1605. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to Sir Charles Hailes. Concerning the same.

May 10, 1605. York. Sir Charles Hailes and Sir John Ferme to the English Commissioners. Concerning the same.

April 21, 1605. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Northum¬berland. On Monday last all the Commissioners, save Sir W. Selby and Sir Gideon Murray, rode from Carlisle to Dumfries, where upon the next day one Alexander Armstrong was tried and executed for the death of Sir John Carmichael, his Majesty’s late Warden. I cannot but commend the Scottish Commissioners for their care for his Majesty’s service. If a convenient number of men from both, sides of the border, inured from their youth upwards to blood and theft, were picked out or otherwise sent away, the rest would be the sooner reclaimed.

f.57. April 21, 1605. Same place. The same to the Earl of Cumberland. To the same effect.

¬April 21, 1605. Same place. The same to Lord Cranborne. To the same effect.

July 7, 1605. Same place. The same to the Earl of Northumber¬land. Among the one hundred and thirty-two Grahams sent away, we have sent all in the schedule who are of any account except Hutchin Graham and John Graham, alias Jock of the Pear-tree. There are some bad men of other surnames whom it would be good to send away. At the last gaol delivery three persons dwelling within the liberties of Egremont were executed for murder. A man within your liberties of Cockermouth was slain with the wheel of his own wain. I have seized the wain with the four oxen and the two horses that were yoked in it, for your use, as a deodand.

f.58. July 5, 1605. Edinburgh. Sir William Seaton to Sir W. Lawson. Warm expressions of friendship. Lord Berwick is here, “but a Lord of a doubtsome lordshipp.” He will return to Court as Earl of Dunbar. Though you have wealth, we have liberality. Knight-ships with you are common merchandise, with us they are rewards of virtue. Captain Boyare has been made a knight in this our solemnity.

August 14, 1605.’ Carlisle. Sir W Lawson to Sir W. Seaton. I am glad that some Englishmen deserve to have the order of knight¬hood at Edinburgh, as well as some Scotsmen at London. I am troubled with an evil leg, but Sir W Selby will not fail to be at Hawick on the 26th instant.

N.D. Sir W. Seaton to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the trial of prisoners.

f. 59. List of fugitives and outlaws who entered not to the King’s mercy, upon his proclamation or since, for the most part hearing the surname of Graham, Armstrong, Foster, Urwen, or Blenkinsopp. Some of them are charged with killing the Provost of Dumfries; one, Edward Armstrong, is charged with twelve murders.

f. 60. Petition to the King from Walter Graham of Netherby, and seventy-eight others, for the most part bearing the name of Graham. We and others, after the death of the late Queen, disorderly and tumultuously assembled with all the warlike force and power that we could, and invaded the inland part of the eastern side of Cumberland, and spoiled many Englishmen, with fire, sword, robbery, and murder. Some among us of evil judgment had persuaded us that until your Majesty was a crowned King in England, the laws of the kingdom ceased and were of no force, and that all offences done in the meantime were not punishable. We have deserved death and the confiscation of our lands and goods. Many of us have wives and children who may be able, with better education, to do good service to your Majesty in some other parts of your dominions. We therefore pray that we may be relegated and banished, as an evil colony, to some other parts of your kingdom, there to spend the residue of our days in sorrowing for our offences. We bind ourselves and our posterity to be of good behaviour towards all your subjects.

f. 61. List of seventeen feuds between different families.

List of persons outlawed for felony in Cumberland, between the 34th and 44th years of Elizabeth, one hundred and ten in all, for the most part bearing the surnames of Graham,Hetherington, or Foster,

f. 63. List of persons indicted of murder, burglary, or felonies not pardoned, seventy-nine in all, for the most part bearing the surnames of Graham, Foster, Hetherington, or Armstrong.

f. 64. May 23, 1605. Warrant from the Earl of Cumberland to stay proceedings against William Taylor (as before).

August 14 [1605]. Carlisle. Warrant from the justices of assize to the Sheriff and the Clerk of the Peace of the county of Cumberland to stay proceedings of outlawry against John Matthew and others.

f. 65. Note of the forfeited recognisances in the counties of West-moreland and Cumberland.

October 13, 1605. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the gaol delivery to be held at Carlisle.

List of persons to be sent to Carlisle to appear before the Commissioners on the 6th of November, charged with stealing horses, oxen, and sheep.

f.66. List of such Grahams as stand indicted and convicted of murder, burglaries, ete., both before and after the death of Queen Elizabeth.

1.Hutchin Graham, alias Ritchies Hutchin, outlawed for the murder of Thomas Graham, son of Ritchies WiIl, and of John Orfeur, gentleman, son of William Urfeur, esq., then in the Queen’s service. “Item Hutchin Grayme aforesaid for bringing the lord of Buckclough (Buc¬cleuch) and other Scotts men to the breaking of Carliell Castle, and was the third man that entered the same to the fetchinge of one William Kinnoul forth thereof.” Item for taking 200 bushels of big malt and oats from the inhabitants of Cargoe. Item for speeches against the late Queen and the King. Item for spoiling William Nixon of the Bowe and for burning Johnston of Little Orton.

2. William Graham, alias Mickle WiIl, his brother, convicted for several murders, etc.

3. George Graham, alias Ritchies Geordie, his brother, convicted for thirty different stealths, etc.

4. William Graham, alias Carlisle, his brother, convicted for several horse-stealings, etc., and for taking prisoners into Scotland from Little Orton. 5. Richard Graham, alias Lenox, his brother, and five others convicted of the same or similar offences.

f.67. List of persons to be apprehended by Sir H. Leigh, for rob¬beries in “ill week,” and at other times.

f.68. December 18, 1605. Sir W. Lawson to Sir H. Leigh, Provost Marshal. Warrant for the apprehension of John Hetherington and others.

January 13, 1005 [-6]. Carlisle. Proclamation by the Commissioners against the retention of arms and of horses not required for tillage in certain districts, save by noblemen and gentlemen. Order for the suppression of the office of water bailiff. Order that Englishmen and Scotsmen shall enjoy like privileges in all market towns within the middle shires of Great Britain.

f.69. January 17 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir H. Leigh. Warrant for the apprehension of all persons of the surname of Graham who have returned from the Low Countries, and all other outlaws and fugitives.
Walter Urwen of Kirkpatrick; where the horsemen of Sir H. Leigh in pursuit of William Graham were reviled, and assailed with stones and spears.

January 22, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. Articles framed by the Commis¬sioners for the service against the Grahams and other outlaws. Netherby is to be garrisoned by fifteen horsemen under Sir H. Leigh, and the Hollows by a like number under Sir W. Cranston.

f. 70. January 22, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. The Commissioners to Sir H. Leigh. Warrant for the levy of horsemen.

January 24, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to the Sheriff of Northumberland. Warrant for the apprehension of Robert Davison of Alnwick, servant to Thomas Percy the traitor, indicted for the murder of Roger Smyth, unless William Halle of Heppell, who now has custody of him, will enter sufficient security that he shall not escape.

January 25, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. Certificate by the English Com¬missioners of the reprieve granted to Richard Graham of Randelinton and Arthur Graham of Leven briggs, convicted of departing from the Low Countries without licence.

January 26, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. Certificate by the English Com¬missioners of the reprieve granted to Michael Davison of Bitlestone, on the score that he was under twelve years of age when he committed the felonies for which he was convicted.

January 25, 1605 [-6]. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to the Council. Five persons were executed at Carlisle, of whom two were Scots, and seventeen at Newcastle, of whom four were Scots. Few of the Grahams who returned from Flushing and Brill have been apprehended. They expect a general pardon at the end of this Parlia-ment, and in the meanwhile shift from place to place. If the Grahams were not, the country would soon be freed from theft. We desire that Sir W. Lawson may be allowed to stay with us.

f. 71. Same day and place. Sir W. Selby and Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. Six of the persons convicted at Newcastle were followers of Percy the traitor.

Various notes on the condition of the borders.

f. 72. January 30) 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. The Commissioners to the keeper of the gaol at Carlisle. Warrant for the detention of George Graham of Longtowne, and four other Grahams.

List of the Grahams who threatened the tenants of the Earl of Cumberland.

January 31, 1605 [-6]. List of the Grahams who have returned, and who ride in troops, with pistols and lances. Geordies Sandie, Young Netherby, and thirteen others.

February 20, 1605 [-8]. Hole House. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the prisoners whom he has in his custody, and those of whom he has taken bonds.

February 211605 [-6]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Cranston. Concerning the same,

f. 73. Same day and place. The same to Sir H. Leigh. Concerning the gaol delivery.
February 26, 1605 [-6]. Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington to Sir

H.Leigh. Warrant forThe detention of Walter Graham of Netherby, and six other Grahams.

February 7, 1605 [-6]. Edinburgh. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. Concerning the time of the gaol deliveries.

February 21, 1605 [-6]. Berwick. Sir W. Selby to the English Com¬missioners. Concerning the same.

f. 74. February 24, 1605 [-6]. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning the same.

February 26, 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Concerning the same, deprecating delay.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Cranston. Enclose list of persons to be sent to Carlisle for trial, with particulars of the charges against them.

f. 75. February 27, 1605 [-6]. The same to Sir H. Leigh. Warrant for the apprehension of certain persons.

f. 76. Same day and place. The same to the same. Warrant for the apprehension of William Graham of Mill hill, and Fergus Graham, alias Wills Fergie.

List of charges of theft, etc.

f. 77. List of the Grahams returned from Flushing and Brill, who are fugitives—forty in all.

List of the Grahams who are outlaws and fugitives—eighteen in all.

March 1, 1605 [-6]. Penrith. Sir William Hutton to Sir W. Lawson. On behalf of Dicks Davie Graham.

f. 78. February 24, 1605 [-6]. Whitehall. The Earl of Salisbury to the Commissioners. The King desires to know how they have pro¬ceeded against the “runagates” from the cautionary towns.

March 3,1605 [-6]. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. The Earl of Salisbury does not seem to understand how distant the Northumberland Commissioners are from the West border. As you have been lately at Carlisle, you can satisfy him about the Grahams. I am displeased that the Provost Marshal left Eskdale without leave, and that any of the Grahams or other fugitives have been enlarged. Sir W. Cranston should be commanded to return to the Hallows.

March 3, 1605 [-6]. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning the time of the gaol deliveries.

f. 79. February 28, 1605 [-6]. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

March 2,1605 [-6]. Cranston. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. I will send as many of the prisoners as I can to Carlisle.

March 5, 1605 [-6]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Concerning the time of the gaol deliveries, and the answer to be made to the Earl of Salisbury.

f. 80. Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Selby. I would as gladly spare your travel as my own, but this business requires your presence at Carlisle.

March 6, 1605 [-6]. Same place. The same to Sir W. Cranston. Concerning the time of the gaol deliveries, and the transmission of prisoners to Carlisle.

f. 81. March 9, 1605 [-61 Barmore. Sir W. Selby to the other English Commissioners. Concerning the time of the gaol deliveries, and the answer to be made to the Earl of Salisbury. Suggests a meeting at Hexham rather than at Carlisle.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the place of meeting.

f 82. March 11, 1605 [-6]. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the proposed meeting at Hexham.

March 12, 1605 [-6]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

March 11, 1605 [-6]. Carlisle. Henry Leigh (junr.) to Sir W. Law¬son. Concerning certain persons arrested by him.

f. 83. March 12, 1605 [-6]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson and J. Benning¬ton to Henry Leigh. Order that the Grahams in his father’s custody shall be kept within the Castle.

March 13, 1605 [-6]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Henry Leigh and others. Enquiry concerning the number of Grahams who have returned from Flushing and Brill.

March 20, 1605 [-6]. Hexham. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. Many of the Grahams returned from the cautionary towns, some fugitives of that name, and divers of those who broke out of Carlisle Castle, remained dispersed in Esk and in the adjoining countries of Scotland, with desire rather to hide themselves than to do much hurt. When Sir H. Leigh and Sir W. Cranston, with thirty soldiers, came to garrison in Esk, they withdrew themselves among the Carlisles, the Johnstones, and other families related to them. After Sir W. Cranston’s retirement to his own house, many of them returned. Some thirteen have been apprehended, and the rest have been forced to leave Esk. The people of Cumberland abhor and fear the name of Graham. We have required Sir W. Cranston to return to his place of garrison, and given the like crder to Mr. Leigh in the place of his father. The state of Cumberland and Northumberland has grown better since the issue of the Commission. There is no stealing save of trifles, and this is as rare as in other shires in England. We have advised the Earl of Cumberland that his grounds should not be farmed to the wives and friends of the Grahams. We have committed to Carlisle Castle divers of the Grahams who have neither been offenders of late years, nor returned from the cautionary towns. Their restraint will not a little bridle their friends who are out. We desire that felonies committed in the middle shires should be exempted from pardon by a special proviso. We enclose several lists.

(1.) The names of the Grahams returned from the cautionary towns without licence—fifty in all.

(2.) The names of the Grahams returned from the cautionary towns with good passports—eight in all, three of them prisoners in Carlisle Castle.
(3.) The names of the Grahams dead since their re urn from e cautionary towns—six in all.
(4.) The names of the Grahams committed for felony for departing from the service—two in all.
(5.) The names of the Grahams returned from the cautionary towns with counterfeit licences—two in all.
(6.) The names of the Grahams who have good passports at large without return. Matthew Graham, alias Plump, and young Hutchin Graham, a prisoner in Carlisle Castle, the ringleader of the first nine¬teen fugitives, who would not go into the low countries.
(7.) The names of the heads of the Grahams committed to Carlisle Castle upon suspicion of giving “recett” to their friends :—-Walter Graham of Netherby and William Graham of Rosetrees, and six others.
(8.) The names of the Grahams and other fugitives apprehended by Sir Henry Leigh between February 18 and March 13, and sent to Car¬lisle :—Alexander Graham, alias Bell Sandie, Matthew Graham, alias Plump, and four others, three of whom were of the twenty-nine who broke the Castle.
(9.) The names of the Grahams and other fugitives apprehended by Sir W. Cranston since February 18, but not sent to Carlisle according to directions—eight in all, among whom is John Graham, alias Jock of the Pear-tree, a notable thief, “none of his name worse.”
(10.) The names of the condemned prisoners who broke Carlisle Castle, and are now in custody—ten in all.

f. 86. March 20, 1605 [-6]. Hexham. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Cumberland. Concerning the fugitive Grahams.

f. 87. March 16, 1605 [-611. Cranston. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning the prisoners in his custody.

March 20, 1605 [-6]. Hexham. The English Commissioners to Sir W. Cranston. Order to return to the Hallowes with fifteen horsemen and to remain there or in some other garrison place near Esk until further order. Peremptory order to bring his English prisoners to Carlisle.

March 19, 1605 [-6] Same place. The same to Sir Henry Wid¬drington, High Sheriff of Northumberland. Desire to know the names of such as are to be exempted from the general order for disarmament.

f. 88. Same day and place. The same to Sir William Fenwick. To the same effect.

Same day and place. The same to Mr. Talbot. Desire a list of persons indicted.

March 11, 164)5 [-6]. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners. We have received complaint from certain inhabitants of Ridesdale and Tindale in Northumberland that you use “more severe and straite proceedinge” than was intended by the King, by taking into question offences done upon the borders many years ago. They give an instance of one Michael Davison condemned in January last for certain felonies and burglaries committed twelve years ago, when he was but twelve years of age, and of a cousin german of his lately executed for the same offence. We cannot but be somewhat doubtful of your due observation of his Majesty’s meaning.

f. 89. Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Lawson. Concern¬ing the same.
Same day. Usworth. Sir W. Lawson to Sir R. Delaval. Concern¬ing the same.

March 20, 1605 [-6]. Hexham. Certificate that execution had been stayed in the case of Fergie Graham of Wall, convicted of felony com¬mitted “in the ill week.”

March 26, 1606. East Nisbit. Sir Patrick Chirmside to Sir W. Selby. Concerning certain complaints.

March 27, 1606. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to Sir W. Lawson. Con¬cerning certain complaints. Encloses a list of persons cited to appear at Dumfries and Jedburgh, on charges of stealing horses, cattle, etc. —twenty-three charges in all.

f. 91. March 30, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. I have sent to Sir H. Leigh the names of the persons against whom complaint is made in Sir P. Chirmside’s letter, “requiringe that no tyme be forslowed to pei-forme what is re-quired” for their apprehension.

Same day and place. The same to Sir H. Leigh or his son. Con¬cerning the same.
March 27, 1606. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to the other English Commissioners. Concerning the answer to be made to the Council.

f. 92. March 29, 1606. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to Sir W. Lawson and 3. Pennington. Concerning the same. Richard Graham of Randelinton, who was prisoner in the High Castle of Newcastle, has gone away. On account of sickness he had liberty of the Castle. Graham of the Rosetrees entered into recognisances for him. He may be able to get him again.

March 31, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to J. Pennington. Concern¬ing the proposed meeting of the Commissioners.

April 2, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson and 3. Pennington to the other English Commissioners. Concerning the same.

f. 93. January 5, 1605 [-6]. John Taylor to Sir W. Lawson. Offers to recommend him, through the Earl of Cumberland, for the office of Sheriff.

April 6, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to the Scottish Commissioners. I have directed Sir H. Leigh or his son to attend you at Dumfries and Jedburgh with the persons named by you. I desire that all offenders be sent in reciprocally to receive punishment where their offences were committed, without respect of nation.

f. 94. March 27, 1606. Cranston. Sir W. Cranston to the English Commissioners. I returned out of Esk because I found it unprofitable to stay there. I will return as soon as my health permits me to travel. You Will find after experience that his Majesty could be better served with less stir. I was forced to admit outlaws to bond because my corn¬pany was dispersed in two or three parts, and I had not the commodity of a gaol. After a lawful advertisement I will present such of yours as fell into my hands, or else a sufficient penalty. As for such as offended in Scotland I will await the advice of “the conjunct commis¬sion.” If you will needs be commanders, I desire that your discretion may appear as well as your authority. Think not that my body can be
everywhere to do all your services. Our own courts approach. I am charged with the apprehension of the Grahams and several other duties. None come to me with armour. For me to ride to their several houses would be an infinite travel.

April 3, 1606. Crellinge. The same to Sir W. Lawson. Intends to stay five or six days at the Hallows, but his being there openly will do as little good as before.

Same day and place. The same to Sir H. Leigh. Desires the appearance at Jedburgh of seven persons named.

f. 95. April 5, 1606. Penrith. Sir William Hutton to Sir W. Lawson. Complains of the harsh dealings of the Commissioners towards John Taylor, a tenant of the Earl of Cumberland at Levenside.

April 8, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to H. Leigh. Concerning the same. Matters of title are not to be meddled with.

March 30, 1606. The same to Sir H. Leigh and his horsemen. Warrant for the apprehension and delivery of the persons demanded by the Scottish Commissioners.

f. 96. April 14, 1606. Carlisle. The same to Thomas Musgrave, Captain at Beweastle. Warrant for the delivery to the King’s horse¬men of Rynion Blackburne and three others, to be carried to Jedburgh.

April 8, 1606. Dumfries. Sir W. Seaton to Sir W. Lawson. Con¬cerning his movements.

April 12, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Seaton. Concern¬ing the same.

April 3, 1606. Penrith. Sir W. Hutton to Sir W. Lawson. Mr. Henry Leigh has a warrant to apprehend Thomas [Hetherington] of Holesheils for Hector [Armstrong] of Twedon, who was slain by the garrisons of horsemen and footmen under the conduct of Captain Reed and Constable Ord [in or about August, 1603], they being in Lyddes¬dale by command of Sir Richard Musgrave, the deputy to the late Lord Lieutenant. The killing of him was the best service that was done for the border of England these twenty years, for he was a principal murderer, a great and common thief, a spoiler, and a leader of the rest. If the Commissioners of Scotland shall so earnestly seek for redress of such a notorious thief, what good shall we expect of them? Those whom they complain of will be ready to answer for the fact before the King and Council. “The poore man Holesheiles is marvellously frighted with feare to enter into Scotland,” and Lord Cumberland’s business is thereby left undone.

f. 97. April 13, 1606. Henry Leigh to Sir W. Lawson. Gives an account of a fray between Sir W. Cranston and some men who came out of an alehouse near the sand beds of Esk.

April 10, 1606. Barmore. Sir W. Selby to the other English Com¬missioners. Concerning his answer to the Scottish Commissioners and the answer to be made to the Council.

N.D. The same to the Scottish Commissioners. In the roll of names of such as you desired to be sent to Dumfries and Jedburgh, there are those of some men of good quality, free from suspicion of theft. The matters alleged against them were done under the government of the late Earl of Cumberland, by command of his under-officers. We are enjoined by the Council to forbear to call such in question. If, therefore,
any of them are now sent to you, I doubt not that you will forbear to proceed against them.

f. 98. April 13, 1606. Seaton Delaval. Sir R. Delaval to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. I think that the Scottish Commissioners will not care to do according to his Majesty’s pleasure. It is requisite that Sir Richard Musgrave and Sir William Hutton should have notice of what we desire to know of them at the next gaol-delivery at Carlisle.

April 11, 1606. Sir R. Delaval and E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson and
J. Pennington. Concerning the petition of widow Graham of Brackenhill.

April 15, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson td Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. On Thursday last, as Henry Leigh and his man were riding from Dumfries to Milleys, the latter was shot in the ribs by Robs Fergie, one of the fugitives. They lost a mare, and their cloaks, and hardly escaped, both upon one horse. Robs Fergie is said to be since dead. On Saturday Rob of Medopp was rescued from Sir William Cranston.

f. 99. April 15, 1606. Sir W. Hutton to Sir W. Lawson. Com¬plains of various wrongs done to the bailiffs of the Earl of Cumberland by Scotsmen.

f. 100. April 16, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Hutton. Concerning the same.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Cranston. Concerning the same.

April 17, 1606. A brief of the proceedings against the Englishmen at Jedburgh.

April 27, 1606. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Council. (See Domestic State Papers under date.)

f. 102. May 3, 1606. Newcastle. – The same to the same. (See ibid.)

Same day and place. The same .to the Earl of Salisbury. Recom¬mend that the Sheriffs should be brought to account.

f. 103. April 21, 1606. Edward Hall of Weyhill, co. Northumberland to Sir W. Selby. Anticipates trouble on account of his testimony con¬cerning a felony.

April 25, 1606. Christopher Pickering, Sheriff of Cumberland, Thomas Salkeld, Henry Blenco, Sir William Hutton, Lancelot Salkeld, Richard Denton, and Thomas Lamplough, to the English Commis¬sioners. After due consideration of your enquiry, we have found that any forbearance used towards any that were border maletactors has bred greater hurt to the country, and greater insolence in them. Most of these offenders have been so rooted in their “desolate” kind of life that it is almost impossible to reform their disorder. The due execution of justice has always wrought better effect than lenity.

May 2, 1606. Newcastle. Ra. Lawson, Ralph Delaval, Henry Guevara, Thomas Gwinburne, Robert Brandlinge, Robert Midford, James Raynes, John Delaval, Joshua Delaval, John Browne, Thomas Midleton, Edward Charleton, and R. Fenwick, to the English Commis¬sioners. To the same effect.

November 18, 1605. The information of Henry Guevara against John and Michael Davison 6f Bitleston. (See Domestic State Papers, April 27, 1606.)

f. 104. May 3, 1606. Newcastle. Sir W. Selby and Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. ((See Domestic State Papers under date.)

December 16, 1605. Elsden in Ridsdale. John Smaythwate to Sir W. Selby. Enclosure. (See Domestic State Papers, as above.)

April 27, 1606. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Council. Concerning the eases of Mungo Ribton and John Skelton.

April 28, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir H. Leigh and his horsemen. Warrant for the delivery of David Graham of Bankhead. Matthew Graham, alias Plumpe Alexander Graham, alias Bell Sandie, and Rynion Graham, to the Mayor of Newcastle, to be sent into the Low Countries.

f. 105. May 2’, 1606. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to Viscount Lisle, Governor of Flushing. We have sent three of the Grahams to be reconveyed to Flushing.

April 19, 1606. Jedburgh. Sir Patrick Chirmside and Sir Gideon Murray to the English Commissioners. Concerning the persons re¬quired to appear before them and before the English Commissioners respectively. Enclose a list of the former containing forty-eight names, among which are those of John Musgrave of Edenhall (Eednell), William Musgrave of the Castle, brother to Mickle John Musgrave, Thomas Hetherington of Holesheiles, and Thomas Orde, called Constable Orde in Berwick.

f. 106. May 3, 1606. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. Concerning the reciprocal delivery of persons accused.

April 27, 1606. Crellinge. Sir W Cranston to the English Com¬missioners. Concerning the same.

f. 107. April 19, 1606. Same place. The same to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the same.

May 3, 1606. Newcastle. The English Commissioners to Sir W Cranston. Complain that of forty persons demanded none were sent to their gaol delivery, nor any of the Grahams or English fugitives. Require him to go to the Hallowes with his horsemen and there to abide until discharged.

Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Cumberland. On behalf of Fergus Graham of Wall, co. Northumberland, who has in great part made satisfaction for felony committed in “the ill week.”

Same day and place. Certificate of the opinion of Sir William Fenwick against the pardoning of old offences.

List of persons of the name of Hall outlawed or put upon the capias in the countries of Northumberland and Durham.

f. 108. April 27, 1606. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the keeper of the city gaol. Warrant for the discharge of John Hilton, on bail.

May 5, 1606. Appleby. Sir W. Lawson to the Speaker of the Par¬liament House. Solicits pardon for his absence. Cumberland is now as free from blood and theft as most parts of England. At the last gaol delivery, on the 24th of April, there were but two found guilty, the one of petty larceny, and the other of a small felony, who had his
[benefit of] clergy. Northumberland is not altogether so free. One was executed and the other reprieved. If the runagate Grahams were apprehended and brought to justice, these countries would continue peaceable.

Same day and place. The same to the Bishop of Carlisle. I send this to London by Sir Edward Musgrave. If the Grahams could be apprehended, or banished from Esk, this country would become as peaceful as any other. There are bad men on the other side. At the last sessions of the peace I earnestly moved, in accordance with your letter, to have the bridge built of stone, but few or none were inclined thereto, as the charge would be at least 8001., and there is no certainty of the continuance of the water in its present course.

May 9, 1606. Denholme. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson. I am sorry that your brethren and you have complained of me at Court for having released some of the Grahams on their bonds. If any of you please to attend, you shall hear my defence before the Council on the 17th of this month.

f. 109. April 30, 1606. Whitehall. The Council to the Commis¬sioners. Instructions for the punishment of the Grahams and others according to their offences. Proposal to send some of them to Ireland. Appointment of the Bishop of Carlisle as a Commissioner. (See Domestic State Papers, April 29, 1606.)

f. 110. May 11, 1606. Skipton. The Earl of Cumberland to the Commissioners. I cannot but commend your discreet and even pro¬ceedings. The King and the Council are absolutely resolved to have the country reduced to civil obedience. I am now going to the Court, where I shall ever be ready to move the King and the Lords on your behalf. Sir Charles Hailes intends to set forward from York on the 19th inst. for Carlisle, in order to assist you in the service.

f. 111 May 15, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir R. Delaval, and E. Grey. Encloses the two foregoing letters.

Same day and place. The same to Sir C. Hailes. No fugitives have been apprehended since the last gaol delivery, nor is any gaol delivery yet appointed. You may therefore think it well to stay your journey.

May 11, 1606. Skipton. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson. Desires him to confer with the persons appointed to protect his interests.

May 3, 1606. John Tailor to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the con¬veyance of the letter from the Council.

f. 112. April 16, 1606. Whitehall. The Earl of Suffolk to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. On behalf of the bearer, William Graham, alias Rosetrees.

Good Friday, 1606. Sir H. Leigh to Sir W. Lawson. On behalf of the same, whom the King has been pleased to call “the honest Grayme.”

May 11, 1606. Twisell. Sir W Selby to Sir W. Lawson. I send a letter from the Earl of Dunbar. He requires great secrecy, and therefore made me his clerk not trusting his own secretary. For aught I know, we two shall be the only English Commissioners at Carlisle on the night of the 20th inst.

ND. The Earl of Dunbar to Sir W. Lawson. The King at my last parting from his presence, and by letter since the 1st inst., has com¬manded me to have special care of the peaceable state of the late borders, by apprehension of the disobedient Grahams, the twenty-nine condemned men who broke Carlisle Castle, and other fugitives, and their abettors. I am informed that Sir Richard Lowther of Cumberland gives “recett” to the Grahams. I pray you to make diligent search in his house about daybreak on the 20th inst.. and to bring any fugitives whom you may find there to Carlisle that night, where Sir W. Selby will meet you. The good of this service consists in secrecy. Although I am not acquainted with you, the good opinion held of you by his Majesty and others makes me confident to trouble you with this business.

f. 113. May 13, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby. Being a bad secretary, and unwilling to trust my clerk with the secrecy of this business, I shall not write to the Earl of Dunbar until that be effected which he has appointed.

May 19, 1606. Hexham. Sir W. Selby to Sir W. Lawson. This day Maxwell, Johnstone, Buceleuch, Sir Gideon Murray, and Sir W. Cranston, on the Scottish side, and Sir Wilhiam Fenwick and L on the English, with convenient numbers of men, search all Esk and the countries adjoining, for the disobedient Grahams, the condemned men who broke Carlisle Castle, and other fugitives, by direction of the Earl of Dunbar. I am ready to go towards the waste of Tindale, where there is a great assembly under colour of a great hunting.

May 20, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Dunbar. I have made search for disobedient Grahams in the house of Sir Richard Lowther, but I have found none.

May 21, 1606. Sir W. Selby and Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Dunbar. Six English Grahams and William Armstrong, son of John Armstrong of Kinmont, one of the condemned men who broke Carlisle Castle, have been carried into Scotland. We have received instruc¬tion concerning them from the Council. and we therefore pray that they may be safely sent to Carlisle gaol. We also desire the delivery of three other Armstrongs, breakers of Carlisle Castle. Sir W. Cranston has not delivered the prisoners for whom we applied to him. We desire that you will by your own authority cause Sir W. Cranston to return to the Hallowes or to some other convenient place near Esk. Finding our own commands not well obeyed, we think it vain to trouble him by writing. If you prevail as little, we shall be compelled to complain further.

f.114. Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Salisbury. (See Domestic State Papers.)

f.115. May 11, 1606. Dunbarton. Sir W. Seaton and Sir P. Chirm¬side to the English Commissioners. Concerning the proposed meeting of the Commissioners at Carlisle.

May 27, 1606. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to the Scottish Commissioners. Concerning the same. Enclose list of fourteen persons whom they wish to be brought to them upon the 14th of June at latest—Grahams, Armstrongs, Urwens, and others.

Same day. Carlisle. The same to John Musgrave, leader of the horsemen under the command of Sir H. Leigh, Provost Marshal. Warrant for the apprehension of fugitive Grahams, and breakers of Carlisle Castle.

f.119.. May 22) 1606. Morpeth. E. Grey tci ~ir W. Lawson. Con¬cerning the proposed meeting of the Commissioners.

May 25, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir it Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

Same day and place. The same to. the Mayor of Newcastle. De3ire to know whether he will deal with the Grahams to be sent to him as his predecessor did with the former Grahams. Report that the two Grahams already delivered at Newcastle have escaped. “It will not he well taken above.”

May 26, 1606. Newcastle. Lyonell Madison, Mayor, to Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington. WiIl obey the directions of the Council. There is a ship now preparing for the Low Countries.

f.117. May 26. 16(46. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to the Council. Testimonial in favour of Henry Leigh.

May 29. 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington. Concerning the transmission of letters.

May 17, 1606. Edinburgh. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. Concerning their proposed meeting.

June 3, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Selby, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir ft. Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

June 1, 1606. Same place. The same to the Scottish Commissioners. Concerning the same.

f.118. June 2, 1606. Same place. Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Cumberland. Sir Charles Hailes is now at Carlisle. Expressions of friendship.

Same day and place. The same to John Taylor. Concerning his correspondence with the Earl of Cumberland.

Same day and place. Sir W. Selby. Sir W. Lawson, and J. Penning-ton to Sir H. Leigh. Desire to know how the fifteen horsemen tinder his command, now sent to garrison in Esk under John Musgrave, are to be paid.

June 3, 1606. Same place. The same to the Council. We have been here since the 20th of May, and shall continue by turns to attend the service. We have sent John Musgrave of Plumpton with fifteen horsemen to garrison in Esk, and have written to Sir W. Cranston to lie there also with his fifteen. We went thither with the Sheriff on the 30th of May, and remained until the Earl of Cumberland’s officers had taken peaceable possession of divers tenements within his grants, returning the same evening to Carlisle. No resistance was made. We have left to your consideration certain grounds reputed to be part of his Majesty’s manor, and not within the forest of Nicholl granted to the said Earl. A house called Brackenhill is challenged by the widow of Richard Graham lately deceased, as purchased by his father from Sir Thomas Dacres. We shall proceed against the Grahams according to your instructions. Richard Graham of Randhinton has broken prison. We have reprieved Arthur Graham. There is no likelihood of getting a. convenient number of them to send away. There are not now remaining in Esk or within the Earl of Cumber-land’s grants much above thirty Grahams. married or unmarried, fit to be sent away to make up the number of those that are returned or dead. Most of these absent themselves, preferring, it seems, to die at home with shame than to serve his Majesty abroad with credit. Hutchin Graham had a commission under the privy seal for the appre¬hension of Sandies Rynion. We hope that Jock of the Pear-tree and Jocks Ritchie will h-ic sent down from London, together with William Bell, alias Cutler. Jock of the Pear-tree is one of the five who betrayed Sandies Hynion, and so within the remission. Five worse men cannot be found among all the Grahams than those who are within the remis¬sion. The country continues peaceable.

f. 120. Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Cumberland. We went with the Sheriff to Arthurett Church, and your officers took possession of divers tenements without resistance. We have reserved the case of Thomas Musgrave and other tenants at Bewcastle for the considheration of the Council, as also that of the widow of Brackenhill. We have acquainted some of the principal Grahams with the King’s purpose to transplant sonic families into Ireland. We find them so willing that they humbly entreat to be settled iii the places appointed before winter. We intend to send the unmarried within your grants to the cautionary towns. We pray you to show compassion towards the wives and children of such as willingly went thither at first and did not return. We have not favoured the Graharns or any others more than Christian charity binds us.

Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Salisbury. List of the fifteen horsemen under John Musgrave, gent.

f. 121. June 9,1606. Twisell. Sir W. Selby to the other English Commissioners. Concerning a letter from the Earl of Dunbar.

June 10, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning the gaol delivery.

List of the imprisoned outlaws at Berwick – seven Englishmen, all Grahams or Fosters. and eight Scotsmen, Grahams, Armstrongs, and others.

June 14, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W Lawson to Sir W. Selby, Sir ft. I)elaval, and E. Grey. Concerning certain offenders.

June 14, 1606. Edinburgh. Sir W Cranston to the English Com¬missioners. Concerning the persons demanded by them. Excuses for his absence.

f.122. June 21, 1606. Carlisle. Henry, Bishop of Carlisle, and Sir Charles Hailes to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the gaol delivery. There is no discord among the soldiers.

June 28, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to John Musgrave. War¬rant for the conveyance of certain prisoners to Carlisle.

Same day and place. The same to Thomas Musgrave, Captain at Bewcastle. Warrant for his attendance on John Musgrave with twenty horsemen.

June 24, 1606. The Earl of Cumberland to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Recommends Sir Ralph Sidley.

f. 123. July 2, 1606. Carlisle. Note of the delivery of certain prisoners.

June 26. 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir ft. Delaval and F.. Grey. Concerning their proposed meeting.

June 22, 1606. Twysell. Sir W. Selby to the other English Commissioners Concerning the delivery of prisoners to John Musgrave.

f. 124. June 24, 1606. Greenwich. The Council to the Bishop of Carlisle and the rest of the Commissioners The acquittal of twenty-three persons out of the twenty- even arraigned at Carlisle and New¬castle, will make them bolder. If you will certify the Council in Scot¬land that only two out of fifty Scotsmen accused for recent felonies have been sent to you, they will doubtless take order for the furtherance of the King’s service. We wish all means to be used for the apprehension of the Grahams who returned from the cautionary towns. Let a pardon be drawn for those mentioned in your letter of the 3rd inst. It appears that divers of the Grahams and other surnames were formerly planted in the province of Connaught, where they have grown to be men of good desert and quality. Sir Ralph Sidley being likely to have the disposing of a great quantity of land called Roscommon (Rose common), is well able to place forty or fifty households there. He will give you information as to the commodities of the place, and the fertility of the ground, which will doubtless be welcome to those who are threatened with the hands of justice. All severity should be laid upon such as are unwilling to go, the greater part of them having deserved punishment. The country should contribute towards provid¬ing them with a stock at the first plantation. We will deal with the King for the charges of their transportation.

f. 125. Note of the particular misdemeanours of Hutchin Graham.

1. On Monday after the death of the late Queen, he neglected to stay his friends from their invasion, although admonished to do so by the Bishop of Carlisle, who saw them from the ramparts of the castle.

2. On Tuesday following he brought one hundred and forty of his kinsmen and friends, English and Scottish, to the town of Cargo, near Carlisle, and provided them with victuals for themselves and their horses, free of cost, at the charge of the town. He had for many years taken this town into his protection, receiving from each husbandman four pecks of malt yearly for black mail, these pecks being of Carlisle measure, 20 gallons to the bushel.
3. On the Wednesday following, he crossed the Eden into Grinsdale, where he and his company as men of war erected two “pensills” of linen cloth on the tops of lances.

4. On that day he and his company, armed with jacks, spears, pistols, and steel caps, assaulted Capt. Bowyer, or his lieutenant, and his soldiers.

5. Seeing a company of the townsmen of Carlisle coming to the rescue of his Majesty’s soldiers, he and his company went westward. They spoiled a place called Bow, robbing men in the way, and afterwards spoiled the town of Orton, where they burned the house of Johnston and took prisoners.

6. He went back to Cargo, and there divided such spoil as was brought in by his company, he and young [Graham of] Netherby as captains taking an eighth of the whole spoil.

7. Having obtained from the King a promise of remission, he has not made restitution to the parties grieved. He refused to go to the Low Countries, and became a ringleader of nineteen others of his name, who fled into Scotland. Subscribed by the English Commissioners.

Certificate concerning ninety Grahams and their families dwelling upon Esk and Leven. Twenty-three are worth 201. a year and upwards, and are declared fit to be transplanted. Among these are :—
• Walter Graham of Netherby, his wife and eight children, of whom the eldest is an outlaw, and the second a disorderly person;
• William Graham Rose¬trees, his wife and six children;
• Hutchin Graham, alias Young Hutchin, his wife and three children;
• one Graham &t Flushing and another at Brill.

Eleven worth 20l. a year and upward are fugitives.
Seven worth 10l. a year and upward are fugitives.
Six worth 101. a year and upward are declared fit to be transplanted.
Eleven are not worth 10l. a year.
Six are cottingers and outlaws.
Twenty-six are cottingers answerable and poor people.

f. 127. July 5,1600. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Scottish. Concerning a proposed meeting of the Commissioners at Carlisle, and the persons whose delivery is demanded. Sir William Cranston has written to us, but, instead of offenders we received only paper. He has neither gone to Esk with his horsemen, as commanded by us, nor made excuse. If these faults be not amended, we must give over the service, and make the cause known.

July 1, 1606. Notes on the letter from the Council of the 24th of June.

f. 128. July 5, 1606. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Council. We have called before us those of the Grahams who are con¬fined to the city of Carlisle as pledges for their children and friends, and they, after some deliberation, yielded to the proposal for their transpor¬tation into Ireland. Peartree and Jocks Ritchie, prisoners in the Castle, immediately petitioned to be sent thither also, and we have accepted their request in consideration of the great number of that name who by their means might be drawn to be transported. They have promised to bring in their friends, fugitives, within eight days. Hutchin Graham, a man of the greatest mind and means among them, did not petition, relying on the King’s remission. We called him to the bar publicly, and told him that he had obtained it upon a false suggestion, as he was not at the taking of Sandies Rynion, and that he had not fulfilled the con¬ditions by good behaviour since. An hour later he also petitioned. The country is at peace. Sir Ralph Sidley has told us that each house-holder to be transported should have at least 201., wherewith to maintain himself until the land in Ireland should yield profit. We find that no sufficient sum can be drawn from the benevolence of the country.

f. 129. Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Cumberland. On behalf of John Musgrave, who has taken several outlaws, among whom was Francis Urwen, outlawed for the murder of the Provost of Dumfries.

July 19, 1606. Greenwich. The King to the Commissioners. Warrant for the delivery to Sir Ralph Sidley of the Grahams chosen for transportation to Ireland. Those who wish to go thither from the cautionary towns must come to England at their own expense or at the expense of their friends. Those who refuse to go, and other notorious offenders, are to be prosecuted. A dozen horsemen may be obtained from Berwick. Lists of the gentlemen willing to contribute to the cost of transportation, and of those unwilling to contribute, are to be sent to the King.

f. 130. July 20, 1606. Greenwich. The Earl of Salisbury to the Commissioners. Concerning the murder of an ale-house keeper, and the punishment of the murderers.

July 17, 1606. Same place. The same to the same. The King and Council are busy on account of a fresh advertisement of the arrival of the King of Denmark in England.

July 20, 1606. Same place. The Council to the Commissioners. Instructions as to the preparations to be made for the transportation of the Grahams to Ireland.

f. 131. July 23, 1606. Carlisle. Articles agreed upon by the Com¬missioners for the government of the middle shires. All causes, civil and criminal, committed before the death of the late Queen, to be super¬seded until further directions be received from the King or the Council. Offences committed “in the ill weeke,” that is to say between the death of the Queen and the 11th of April next ensuing, to be punished accord¬ing to the letters of the Council. All complaints concerning spoils, etc. done “in the busie weeke” to be made to Sir H. Leigh and Sir W. Cranston, who shall procure satisfaction before the 23rd of October, or commit the delinquents to prison. Causes of felony to be examined by the Commissioners.

July 30, 1606. Carlisle. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. Having taken very great bonds, and fathers and sons as pledges, we are persuaded that all the Grahams, seeing a resolute course taken, will no longer hazard their lives, but come in ready for transportation At the last gaol delivery on the 28th, we executed none of them, and we hope to end the business without blood. We send a list of the gentlemen and freeholders of Cumberland who have offered to contribute to the transportation of the Grahams, but we still think that a competent sum cannot be raised in this manner. Workington and Ravenglass would afford the most ready passage into Ireland. The want of money for stock is now the chief obstacle.

f. 132. List of contributions promised by the gentlemen and free-holders of Cumberland towards the transplantation of the Grahams

Christopher Pickeringe, Sheriff of Cumberland, 51.; Sir Edward Mus¬grave, 5l. ; Sir W. Hutton, 41. ; Sir John Dalston refused on the bench in open court; Thomas Salkeld, esq., 40s. ; Henry Dacres, esq., 50s. Christopher Curwen, esq., 40s. ; Richard Denton, esq., 40s. ; and twenty-eight others offer sums varying from 20s. down to 2s. 6d. Thomas Thompson, gent., John Lancaster, gent., and William Cowx. yeoman, refuse to contribute.

July 29, 1606. Warrant for the release from prison of John Noble of the Park head.

f. 133. Same day. Carlisle. Warrant for the release from prison of Hutchin Graham, and six other Grahams, on bail.

July 30, 1606. Memorandum concerning the release of Thomas Nixon of Croft.

July 24, 1606. Citation to John Selbie of Grindon to appear at Jed¬burgh on the 23rd of October.

August 17, 1606. Greenwich. The Council to the Commissioners. Censure the backwardness of the northern gentry in offering money, and especially the conduct of Sir John Dalston. Those persons named as having means to help themselves in the first plantation may be trans¬ported with all expedition.

August 14, 1606. Peebles. Sir W. Cranston to Sir W. Lawson. Sends list of nine prisoners convicted before the Earl of Dunbar and others at Peebles.

f. 134. August 16, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Cranston. Sends list of thirty-five Grahams who still stand out.

Same day and place. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir Charles Hailes, and Sir W. Lawson to Mr. Lyons. Concerning the payment of the soldiers.
Same day and place. The same to John Musgrave. Warrant for the apprehension of Clement Hetherington of Tor Crossett, son-in-law of the great outlaw Antons Edward [Armstrong], so that he may be sent away to Ireland.

f. 135. August 15, 1606. List of the justices and gentlemen who agree that fifty families of the most notorious offenders of the Grahams be transported into Ireland and that the country yield a contribution of 3001. Among the names is that of Sir John Dalston.

Order that the rate shall be levied, in Allerdale Ward with Millom, 1201., in Cumberland ward 501., in Eskdale ward 401., in Leith ward and Alston Moor, 901.

August 18, 1606. Assessment of the different townships above and beneath Derwent.

f. 136. September 9, 1006. Naworth Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson. Both Scotland and England “lye onelie upon me,” for there is not a week, and scarce a night but they steal either from me or my tenants. It grieves me that so wicked a thief and murderer as Flaughtaile should be transported “ without answeringe the law.” Pardons have not heretofore been so easily obtained. I can prove that one Archibald Mackwittie, a Scotsman, dwelling with one Herbert Maxwell under Lord Maxwell, has stolen my cattle. I pray for his delivery, and that of one Archibald Armstrong, brother of Andrew Whithaugh, at whose house five of my cattle were found yesterday. If such open felonies escape unpunished, lamentable will be the state of these parts.
Same day. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Flaughtaile came in upon conditions, and therefore he must either be sent away or set at liberty. Will write to the Scottish Commissioners for Archibald Mavittie and Archibald Armstrong.

f. 137. September 10, 1606. Carlisle. The same to Sir John Char¬teris Desires the apprehension of four cattle-stealers.

September 12, 1606. Carlisle. The Commissioners to the Lord Deputy of Ireland. Request him to moderate any differences that. may arise between the Grahams to be transported and their landlord, Sir Ralph Sidley. The counties of Cumberland and Westmoreland, hav¬ing sustained great losses from the Grahams, have contributed a great sum of money to redeem their peace.

Same day and place. Sir W. Lawson to Sir John Cranston at Den¬holme. Desires the apprehension of four cattle-stealers, as in his letter to Sir J. Charteris.

f 138 September 12, 1606, Articles of agreement concerning the transportation of the Grahams, with list of those delivered to Sir Ralph Sidley. (See Calendar of Irish State Papers, 1603-1606. pp. 551-558.)

f. 142. September 13, 1606. Carlisle. The Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. We have sent the chief Grahams to the port of Workington, under the conduction of the Sheriff of Cumberland, with the assistance of the county, and of Mr. John Musgrave’s horsemen. We have not been able to send away fifty families, because some of the poorer sort who had yielded themselves into transportation, at the instant thereof fled, out of weariness of their bondage to their masters, the chief Grahams. There are not now left between Leven and Sarke more than three Grahams of ability, of whom two are more than eighty years of age. All the notorious offenders whose manner terrified all peaceable men, are gone away. Some of their wives who cannot go now will follow in the spring. By their clamours and our entreaties they have been allowed to gain the corn, hay, and grass of this season without any allowence of rent to the Earl of Cumberland, so that he can have little or no profit of his” sign iorie” this year. We find Sir R. Sidley well affected to use the Grahams well, if they shall so deserve. We hkve committed to him the 3001. levied for them from the country. There yet remains almost 2001. to be levied, which may be used either to transport others, or to increase the stock of those now transported. Although Esk, Sarke, and Leven are purged of evil men, there remain others fit to follow in Bewcastle and Gillesland. The Grahams carry with them many horses and much household stuff. There are yet remaining outlaws the sons of Walter Graham of Netherby, and divers others. Certificates concerning certain prisoners.

f. 143. September —, 1606. The Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson to the Council. Enclose an account of the charges of removing the Grahams from Carlisle to Workington. Charges for men and ships pressed for the King’s service from the 1st of August to the 13th of September, and for provisions. List of the ships employed—six in all, which carried 45 horses, 114 Grahams, Sir Ralph Sidley and four men. Charges for carts, boats, and wages. The total amounts to 135!. 8s. 5d.

f. 145. September 19, 1606. Warvell. Andrew Oglethorpe to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the foregoing account, and the affairs of the Earl of Cumberland.

September 19. 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to A Oglethorpe]. Concerning the same.

Same day. The same to the Earl of Cumberland.
Same day. The same to John Taylor.

September 19, 1606. Naworth. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the trial of Christopher Armstrong of the Lang¬holme, and the frequent stealing of cattle from Getsdale Forest.

f. 146. September 20, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning the same.

September 22, 1606. Same place: The same to Lord William Howard. Concerning the same.

September 21, 1606. Rose Castle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W Lawson. Concerning the gaol delivery.

Note concerning the trial of William Story.

f. 147. October 3, 1606. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle Sir W. Lawson, J. Pennington, arid E. Grey to the Earl of Salisbury. At the gaol delivery on the 3rd, three Scotsmen and two Englishmen were convicted. Some Grahams have lately returned from the cautionary towns. We hope that they will undertake to follow their friends into Ireland in the spring. The Grahams had a prosperous voyage. They embarked at Workington on the Saturday at night, and arrived safely at Dublin on the next Tuesday in the morning. Two knights of their own name and kindred came to them there, and comforted them with kind entertainment and promises of help.

October 5, 1606. Same place. Sir W. Lawson, J. Pennington, and E. Grey to the Earl of Salisbury. Concerning the death of Christopher Armstrong, alias Barnegleese.

Narrative by John Musgrave and nineteen others of the search of the house of Christopher Armstrong, alias Barnegleese, in Scotland, and of his being killed on the 22nd of September.

f. 148. October 4, 1606. Dumfries. Sir W. Seaton to Sir W Lawson. Gives a different narrative of the death of Christopher Arm¬strong, and complains that the country is scandalised at the action of Sir W. Hutton and John Musgrave.

October 6,1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Seaton. Sends a copy of the narrative of John Musgrave, who utterly denies the words imputed to him.

f. 149. October 5, 1606. Same place. The same, J. Pennington and E. Grey to [the same ?] Complain that restitution has not been made “for hurts done in the busie weeke.”

N.D. The same to John Musgrave. Warrant to deliver Watt Urwen, alias Kirkpatrick, to the Scottish Commissioners.

N.D. The same to Mr. Lyons. Order to pay the wages of a horse¬man.

October 5, 1606. Note of a pardon granted to John Armstrong, late of Hexham, for robbery done in “the busie weeke.”

October 7, 1606. Dumfries. Sir W Seaton to Sir W. Lawson. I esteem Mr. Musgrave’s narration one of the slightest purgations that ever I heard in such a case. Be so good as to deliver to us Christie Armstrong called Christie of Langholme. As to the restitution to the men of Gillesland, I have been told that Robert Ellnor is using all possible dilligence” to keepe his clyett and appointed tyme.” Thomas Graham, alias Thomas Stupe, man to Thomas Story of Howend, must be sent to us at Dumfries.
October 8, 1606. Isell. Sir W Lawson to Sir W Seaton (Selby) in MS.). Answer to the foregoing.

f. 150. Same day and place. The same to J. Musgrave. Warrant for the apprehension of Thomas Graham, alias Stupe.

October 10, 1606. Annan Sir W. Seaton to Sir W. Lawson. Con¬cerning a proposed meeting of the Commissioners and the delivery of certain offenders.

October 11, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to J. Musgrave. War¬rant for the apprehension of David Litle of Craigburne, and David flalliday dwelling upon Esk.

October 14, 1606. Cockermouth. The same to Sir W. Seaton. Con¬cerning the proposed meeting of the Commissioners and the delivery of offenders.

f. 151. Same day and place. The same to Sir R Delaval and E. Grey. Concerning the same.

October 14, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the proposed meeting.

October 19, 1606. Rose Castle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning a gaol delivery. John Musgrave will explain the danger that the soldiers were in from some Barneglesse’s friends when they last went to Scotland with prisoners.

f. 152. October 14, 1606. Cockermouth. Sir W. Lawson to J. Musgrave. Concerning the delivery of prisoners to the Scottish Com¬missioners.

October 18, 1606. Newby at Annan. Sir W. Seaton to Sir W Lawson. Concerning the admission of Christie of Langholme to bail. It dloes not agree with your honour to favour any “limber.” If we light not on him, “let us have the extract (estreat) of his bond for¬feited to be uplifted to his Majesty’s beehoofe.” Mr. Musgrave’s matter will not be slightly slipped over.

October 19, 1606 Cockermouth. Sir W. Lawson to J. Musgrave. warrant for the delivery of prisoners to the Scottish Commissioners.

October 21, 1606. Isell. The same to Sir W Seaton. Concerning the admission of Christie of Langholme to bail, and the death of Barne¬gleese, at great length.

f. 153 Same day and place. .The same to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning the foregoing, and the course to be taken with outlaws.

f. 151. Same day and place. The same to E. Grey. Concerning John Musgrave.

October 9, 1606. Penrith. Sir W Hutton to Sir W. Lawson. Defends himself from the slanderous imputations of Sir W Seaton concerning the death of Barnegleese, and from the charge of having taken money from prisoners for their release.

October 25, 1606. Jedburgh. The Scottish Commissioners to Sir W Lawson. Notify his appointment as convener.

f. 155. November 5, 1606. Isell. Sir W Lawson to the officers of the Earl of Cumberland upon Esk. Injunction not to molest the cattle of-the Fosters.

November 2, 1606. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners. Commend their diligence in the service of sending away so many of the Grahams. Desire to be informed of the names of those who refuse to contribute towards the sum of 2001. which has yet to be levied. The King is willing that the Grahams who have returned from the cautionary towns, and some of the former outlaws, should be allowed to go to
Ireland if they will give security for their abode there. He is very desirous that justice should be administered on the late borders. Com¬plaints have been made of the partiality of the Captain of Bewcastle.

f. 156. November 6, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson. Lord William [Howard] says that Sir W. Selby is covertly seeking to overthrow the Commission.

November 11, 1606. Rose Castle. The Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W Lawson to the Council. Two of the Grahams lately transported into Ireland have returned, of whom we have already apprehended one. We hear sundry rumours that many of the most offensive persons among them have landed in Scotland. The Graham now in prison says that they left because they could get none of the money entrusted to Sir R Sidley for their relief. We beseech you to examine Sir Ralph as to this at his next being at court.
Same day and place Sir W. Lawson to the Earl of Salisbury. Desires to be excuse from attendance in Parliament on account of his duties as convener.

November 14, 1606. Seaton Delaval. Sir R Delaval to the Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson. Excuses himself from going to Carlisle on the score of bodily weakness..

f. 157. November 14, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to the Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson. Excuses himself from going to Carlisle on the score of his wife’s illness.

November 11, 1606. Rose Castle. Sir W. Lawson to E. Grey.

November 20, 1606 Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Law¬son, and J. Pennington to the Justices of Westmoreland and Cumber¬land. Desire them to pay the money already collected for the trans¬plantation (if the Grahams, and to use all diligence to levy what is behind.

November 9, 1606. Skipton Castle. Andrew Oglethorpe to Sir W Lawson. Concerning the claims of the Fosters.

November 22, 1606. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Law¬son, and J. Pennington to [the Council]. Sir W Selby has been long absent. We have never had the aid of the horseman under his charge. Sir R. Delaval and Mr. Grey cannot at present discharge their service. After the 11th of December we will send you the names of those who refuse to contribute. The Captain of Bewcastle readily undertakes the apprehension of offenders within that charge, but he slenderly performs it. How lie has stood affected to the good of his country may be gathered by his affinity, in that he matched one of his base daughters with “ that bloodie andi theevish clanne of the Armestrongs of Whithaugh in Liddesdlale, by whom and their allies many horrible spoiles and cruell murders have been committed.” His house has been known as “an usuall receptakle “ of those infamous sons of Sandies Rynion, the murderers of Sir John Carmichael. Three of the Grahams are now in prison. Since the beginning of this service, the principal let has been the want of apprehension of olferidlers. ‘the number of outlaws is great, as appears by the schedule. Our garrison is only fifteen. We pray that the ten under Sir W. Selby may be sent hither, the winter season and the ‘ nakedness” of the woods ministering the best opportunity of pursuit.

f. 158. List of outlaws—Ritchie Graham of Netherby, Arthur Graham of the same, Thomas Graham of the same, and fifty-one others bearing the names of Graham, Story, Urwen, Armstrong, andi Foster.

1. 139. Same day and place. The same to Sir W. Cranston. Order for the delivery of George Cang.

Same day arid place. Sir W. Lawson to Sir W Seaton. Suggests a conference between the English and the Scottish Commissioners on the 4th of January, for the compounding of feuds.

Same day. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W Lawson, and J. Penning-ton to the Commissioners of Northumberland Notice of a gaol delivery to be held on the 11th of December.

November 18, 1606. The Duchy House. The Earl of Cumberlandi to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning his appointment as High Sheriff.
Giffe God grant abilitie, I sall do goodwill to keepe dyatt.” George Cang is a fugitive.

December 6, 1606. Rose Castle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W Lawson. On behalf of the gaoler, Marmaduke Maungie.

December 3, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to the Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W Lawson and J. Pennington. Excuses himself from attending the gaol delivery. Sir R. Delaval is not expected to live.

N.D. Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington to the Scottish Commis¬sioners. Notification that Richard Graham of Netherby, Arthur Graham of the same, and three others named, have submitted them¬selves to the King’s mercy.

December 13, 1606. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Law¬son, and J. Pennington to [the Council]. Richard Graham of Netherby, principal of that clan, and an outlaw of the greatest note, has volun¬tarily submitted himself for transportation into Ireland. Others are and will be drawn to follow his example. Account of proceedings at the gaol delivery. Those Grahams who remain here complain that Sir Ralph Sidley does not perform his covenant with those in Ireland. If this be so, hunger and poverty will thrust them into these parts again.

f. 161. October 27, 1606. Athlone. William Graham of Medopp and Richard Graham to Mickle William Graham, brother of the second. We do not get the money that was set down by the Commissioners. We have spent all our money, and cannot get a penny to buy meat and drink withal. We have came a day’s journey with him (Sir R. Sidley) “to be at a point with him,” but could not.

ND. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson. It was resolved by some that you should be discharged of all offices. You now stand charged with double offices. It was decreed at Carlisle that the Com¬mission should be dissolved, and that a new Commission should be granted to one who should have authority both for England and Scot¬land. Under him Sir W. Selby was to have the sole government in Northumberland, and Mr. Thomas Salkeld in Cumberland. Mr. Thomas Salkeld spoke openly. He expected no cross but by my means, which were not wanting. Remarks about the offences imputed to Christopher Langholme and Humphrey Bell.

f. 162. December 13, 1606. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning Christopher Langholme and Humphrey Bell. He will endeavour to discharge his duty.

November 30, 1606. The Duchy House. John Taylor to Sir W. Lawson. My Lord’s friends continue constant to him. I have been very busy since I came to town. The Lords have been full of business by reason of the term and the Parliament.

December 22, 1606. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Encloses a letter from the King.

December 13, 1606. Westminster. The King to the Commissioners. We do not find so good success of your proceedings as we expected. You were ordered to attend directions from our Council from time to time. It seems necessary to ease you of the labour of sending so far. We have therefore appointed the Earl of Dunbar, who is a councillor in both our kingdoms, and likely to be often at Berwick, to resolve any difficulties that may arise in the execution of your service.

f. 163. Same day and place. The same to the Earl of Dunbar. Our meaning is not to give you any authority to proceed as a judge or commissioner, but to require you to assist the Commissioners with advice, and we authorize you to cause search to be made for loose persons, and to deliver them to the Commissioners.

December 23, 1606. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to the Bishop of Carlisle. Encloses letters from the King.

December 20, 1606. Edinburgh. The Scottish Commissioners to the English. We cannot ‘ keepe diett with you” before the 2nd of March at Carlisle or Berwick. We desire to have an enrolment of the feuds between the two countries, so that all parties “interressed in matters of blood” unreconciled may appear and give in their griefs.

f. 161. December 24, 1606. Naworth Castle. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson, High Sheriff of Cumberland. I have sent Christie of Langholme to Carlisle to be committed to gaol. If Sir W. Selby could have had his will, your commission would have been dissolved, and a new commission established, whereby lie would have been sole Commissioner in Northumberland and Mr. Thomas Salkeld sole Com¬missioner in Cumberland.

December 27, 1606. Same place. The same to the same. I pray you to detain Christie of Langholme from delivery into Scotland until the opposite Commissioners deliver to you Archie Mackwittie. Advice about a writ.

January 2, 1606 [-7]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning Archie Mavittie, Christie of Langholme, and Flaughtailes.

December 18, 1606. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners. Order to make examination concerning the proceedings of John Mus¬grave in killing Christopher Armstrong, and to determine the matter according to justice.

f. 165. December 24, 1606. Same place. The same to the same. Those Grahams who have returned from Ireland deserve the least favour. You are to proceed with them in justice, both for their own offences, and for example’s sake. Those who returned from the cautionary towns, and those fugitives who now voluntarily enter them¬selves, may have the favour of transplantation into Ireland if they give good security for their speedy departure thither. Let justice proceed against those who do not give good caution for their departure, and those who are still fugitives. We have written to the Lord Deputy [of Ireland] desiring him to deal earnestly with Sir R. Sidley for such good usage as may encourage the Grahams to continue there. We have written to Sir W. Selby to send the ten horsemen tinder his charge to Carlisle, according to your desire. You may call the Captain of Bew¬castle before you, and tell him that it is not the King’s pleasure that he should by himself command all the inhabitants within that precinct as he has done heretofore in troublesome times, and that he must not interrupt the execution of your warrants.

December 30, 1606. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to the other Com¬missioners. Concerning a proposed meeting.

f. 166. January 2, 1606 [-7]. Rose Castle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning letters from the Council and E. Grey. “If you would come and dwell at Carliel, you should have newes pipinge hote as soone as I.”

January 9, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The same to the Earl of Salisbury. It is doubted whether Sir W. Lawson and Sir W. Selby, being appointed High Sheriffs of Cumberland and Northumberland, may lawfully sit in judgment in their several counties. At all gaol deliveries, except when Sir Charles Hales was here, Sir W Lawson has given both the charge and the judgment. No other of the Commissioners is willing to undergo that burden.

Same day and place. The same and Sir W. Lawson to the same, informing him of the death of Sir R. Delaval on the 1st inst.

December 4,1606. Edinburgh. Sir W Cranston to Sir W. Lawson and J. Pennington. Concerning Geordie Urwin, alias Kang.

December 29, 1606. Crellinge. The same to the same. Concerning the same.

January 10, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson an(l J. Pennington to the Scottish Commissioners. Concerning their proposed meeting on the 2nd of March, and concerning Arclie Mavittie. They approve the proposal to divide the late marches into two parts.

f. 167. January 8, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning an enquiry to be held.

January 11, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The same to the same. Con¬cerning certain writs.

January 11, 1606 [-7]. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. Lord William Howard, riding in person with his servants and followers, has apprehended three infamous offenders, Thomas Armstrong. alias Antons Edwards Tom, John Armstrong, alias Jock Stow¬lugs, anti Christopher Urwin. He took great. pains to pursue them, riding all the night from his own house upon the late borders to the confines of Yorkshire.

f. 168. November 21, 1606. Whitehall. The Council to the High Sheriff of Cumberland. Order to make a list of persons having 41. a year of freehold in their own right, o in the right of their wives, com¬petent to serve on juries, not excepting justices of the peace, so that proceedings in trials may not be so scandalous as heretofore by the return of mean and ignorant people upon juries.

January 11, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to the Council. Sends a list of freeholders as required.

January 12, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The same and J. Pennington to Sir John Charteris. Concerning a grey mare stolen from Esk.

January 9, 1606 [-7]. Naworth Castle. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson. I would have been very glad to have seen you in my poor house, but sorry that you should lose so mutch labotir in this cold weather and in such foul ways. I was away “fishing,” andi I took as many as I could get. I was in hopes to have taken Antons Edwardi himself, but, for want of a better, was glad to take his son Thomas, Gifford [Chris. Urwin], and Jock Stowlugs, the last but not the least in villainy. I desire yotu to keep him for a jewel of high price. Pray cause the records to be searchiedl. If yotm find matter sufficient to hang the other two, “howd up your finger” and they shall be delivered. I confess myself a southern novice.

January 25, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir W. Hutton. Desire him to come to Carlisle.

Same day and place. The same to Sir Richard Musgrave. Order to come to Carlisle.

Jantiary 26, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The same to the Lord President of the North and the Council [at York]. A robbery has been com¬mitted on the person of Richard Craven, deputy-receiver of his Majesty’s revenues in Westmoreland and Cumberland and above 2001. has been taken from him besides his books. bills, and bonds. Thomas Musgrave, son of Sir Richard Musgrave of Norton, en. York, John Musgrave late of Fairbank, co. Cumberland and Christopher Pickering late of Crosby Ravensworth co. Westmoreland, both household ser¬vants of Sir Richard Musgrave of Edenhall, co. Cumberland, are believed to have committed the robbery. All three are said to have fled into Yorkshire. They are very young men

f. 170 Same day and place. The same to George Selby, Mayor of Newcastle. Concerning the same matter.

Same day and place. The same to — Bradlell. Concerning the same matter.

January 29, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The English Commissioners to the Earl of Salisbury. John Armstrong alias Stowlugs, Thomas Arm¬strong, alias Edward’s Tom, Christopher Urwin, alias Gifford Carleton, Robert Graham, and William Graham, alias Flaughtaile, have been tried and executed The third of these was a fugitive from Brill, returned from Ireland. The last was a most infamous murderer, returned from Ireland. He was taken in the Bishopric of Durham by Lord William Howard whom we still find a great furtherer of justice. The peace of these parts. which was reasonably well settled, is much dis-turbed by the robbery of Mr. Craven on the 13th inst. on his travel between Penrith and Kendal. We have reason to believe that John Musgrave of Catterlen caused the robbery to be done. By his own confession he was with the suspected robbers the night before at Penrith, and he harboured two of them the night after in his own house. We have committed him to ward.

f. 171. Same day and place. The same to the Scottish Commis¬sioners. Concerning the exchange and the punishment of divers offenders.

January 30, 1606 [-7]. Naworth Castle. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson “You make on my behalfe a mountaine of a moule hill.” Words are but compliments; deeds shall testify my affection to you.

January 31, 1606 [-7]. Hardington. Sir W. Scaton to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning their proposed meeting, and the powers committed to the Earl of Dunbar.

February 1,1606. Amesfield. Sir John C’hiarteris to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the same.

f. 172 February 4, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the fugitive Musgraves, and the proposed visit of the Earl of Dunbar.
February 10, 1606 [-7]. Twizel. Sir W. Selby to the Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington. There is more need of the ten horsemen in Northumberland than in Cumberland. The Earl of Dunbar desires that their departure should be stayed. Since 1605 the number of outlaws in Esk has become much less. There are now six in Northumberland for one in Cumberland, and only ten horsemen.

f. 173. Same day. The same to the other English Commissioners. Proposes that a gaol delivery shall be held at Newcastle on the 4th of March.

February 13, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Encloses a letter.

February 15, 1606 [-7]. Sir W. Lawson to J. Pennington. Concerning their proposed meeting.

February 16, 1606 [-7]. Isell. The same to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning the same.

February 18, 1606 [-7]. Morpeth Castle. E. Grey to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the same.

f. 174. February 21, 1606 [-7]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to E. Grey. Concerning the same.

February 23, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Concerning the affairs of the Earl of Cumberland’s servants and Rosetrees.

Same day and place. John Taylor to the same. Concerning the same.

February 24, 1606 [-7]. Sir W. Lawson to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning their proposed meeting
f. 175 Same day. Isell. The same to John Taylor. Concerning the same.

February 6, 1606 [-7]. Serjeants Inn. George Snigge (Baron of the Exchequer) to the Bishop of Carlisle, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Penning¬ton. Order to examine the information laid against William Taylor and Plantagenett Ireland ;concerning misdemeanours against the Countess Dowager (“ daughter “) of Cumberland.

February 13, 1606 [-7]. Berwick. Sir W. Sea.ton to Sir W. Lawson. The Earl of Dunbar has put off their meeting until the 4th of March. He has done good service by executing five men at Foulden, who would have “cambered” both countries “if he had bene maisters of their heads.”

February 23, 1606 [-7]. Newcastle. Sir W. Selby to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning the proposed gaol delivery.

f. 176. February 25, 1606 [-7]. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W Lawson. Concerning the same. Yesterday John Musgrave’s company apprehended Geordie of the Gingler, alias Henharrow, a man of some note upon the borders.

Same day. Carlisle. John Taylor to Sir W Lawson. Concerning the illness of the Earl of Dunbar and the proposed gaol delivery.

February 23, 1606 [-7]. Berwick. The Earl of Dunbar to the Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson. “Man purposeth and God deter¬myneth.” Hopes to be well enough to meet them on the 18th of March. Mangerton, Whithaugh, William EIlott, Andrew Armstrong.
and Martin Ellott are executed for very odious and criminal causes, and fourteen others for stealths and other punishable causes.

February 25, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. Sends a copy of the foregoing.

Same day. Newcastle. Sir W. Selby to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning the adjournment of the gaol delivery.

f. 177. January i’8, 1606 [-7]. Whitehall. The Council to the Commissioners. The King has received a petit.ion from William Graham of the Rosetrees and George Graham, his brother, that they may be permitted to remain. He is willing that they should not be constrained to go into Ireland as the rest, but they must remove to some place in England or Scotland not part of the late borders. The Earl of Cumber¬land will provide them with means to settle elsewhere, the measure whereof is to be ordered by the Commissioners.

October 26, 1606. The Court at Royston. Sir Roger Wilbraham to the Commissioners. The King desires tc have their opinion on the case of Anne Graham.

Petition of Anne Graham, wife of George Graham, to the King, praying for permission to continue in the house and land which she and her husband rented of her brother, George Stone, keeper of the royal park at Wandles.

January 4, 1606 [-7]. Whitehall. John Murrey to Sir W. Lawson. On behalf of George Graham, alias Carlisle, a true man who has been outlawed.

f. 178. March 4, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson to Sir W. Selby. Concerning the proposed gaol delivery.

March 2,1606 [-7]. Naworth Castle. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Lawson. On Saturday night I sent my men and apprehended William Graham of the Black house, alias Old Will’s Willy, who escaped when Flaughtaile was taken. Anton’s Edward has written to me, desiring that he may be banished. I have no authority to examine the prisoner Blackhouse, hut he voluntary confesses that since his return from Ireland he and Flaughtaile have been received by Mr. Fetherston of Stanhope (Stannox), a justice of the peace in the Bishopric of Durham, by Dr. Burton there, and by Sir George Hall, clerk, curate of Stanhope. This kind of dealing is intolerable among clergymen and justices of the peace.

March 4, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning a prisoner [W. Graham].

Same day. Naworth Castle. Lord William Howard to Sir W. Law¬son. Concerning the examination of the same.

f. 179. March 5,1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle and Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning the same. As it would be difficult “to circumvent” that ancient murderer [Anton’s] Edward, it will not prove amiss to rid the country of him by banish¬ment.

Same day and place. Sir W. Lawson to the same. Concerning the same.
March 4,1606 [-7]. Berwick. The Earl of Dunbar to the Bishop of Carlisle. The gaols at Berwick and Newcastle are full of felons and malefactors. John Musgrave, Simon Musgrave, Christopher Pickering, and Randell Bell, the four taken for the robbery of the King’s money, will be sent to Carlisle for trial there. Cause John Musgrave and a sufficient number of his company to meet them at Hexham and convey them thence to the gaol.

f. 180. March 11, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Lawson. The garrison is gone to Hexham, and I expect the prisoners to-morrow. Your presence hero -will be absolutely necessary. The gaol is much “pestered “ and will grow worse. A gaol delivery should be held on the last of this month. You will come sufficiently armed to answer all Scottish objections, and like a right Cumberland man. A precise account will be required of what justice has been done on both sides. Expect to bear the whole burden yourself as concerns the English part.

March 12, 1606 [-7]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to the Bishop of Carlisle. Concerning their proposed meeting.

March 11, 1606 [-7]. Newcastle. Sir W. Selby to the same. Con¬cerning the proposed gaol delivery.

Same day and place. The same to Sir W Lawson and J. Penning-ton. The Earl of Dunbar cannot travel before the 9th of April. The King has sent one of his physicians to him.

f. 181. March 10, 1606 [-7]. Berwick. The Earl of Dunbar to the Bishop of Carlisle. To the same effect.

March 12, 1606 [-7]. Carlisle. The Bishop of Carlisle to Sir W. Law¬son. Desires to see him concerning the gaol deliveries in Cumber¬land and Westmorland the sending away the Grahams, the building of Arthuret Church, and other like works.

March 15, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The same, Sir W. Lawson, and J. Pennington to Sir W. Selby. Notice of a gaol delivery.

March 16, 1606 [-7]. Same place. The same three to Sir George Snigg, one of the justices of assize at Lancaster. William Taylor had his pistol and his plate sleeves, but he usually wears these things, as he lives in some danger upon the late dissolved borders, where he is an officer for the Earl of Cumberland. Plantagenet Ireland is charged with no other offence than hindering the carrying away of timber in controversy between the said Earl and the old Countess. We find no cause to send them to Lancaster.

March 21, 1606 [-7]. Naworth. Lord William Howard to Sir W Law¬son. Concerning two men who have shot in his free warren in Gilsland.

March 23, 1606 [-7]. Isell. Sir W. Lawson to Lord William Howard. Concerning the same.

f. 182. Lists of the prisoners tried, and the sentences imposed, at different gaol deliveries at Carlisle, between May 2, 1005, and August 23, 1606.

f. 186. November 21, 1600. Carlisle. Sir W Lawson and J. Pen¬nington to [Christopher] Pickering. Sheriff of Cumberland Warrant for the apprehension of William Bell and others.
List of the Commissioners for numbering the [Scottish] nobility, AD. 1606. John, Earl of Montrose, and thirteen others.
List of the [Scottish] Nobility. A.D. 1606.

The following letters and papers have been transcribed in the unpaged part of the volume by different hands and at different, times

July 17, 1635. Nomination of Deputy Lieutenants for the county of Cumberland

December 6, 1634. Whitehall. The Board of Green Cloth to the Justices of the Peace for the county of Cumberland Concerning pro¬vision for the King’s house.

August 16, 1635. Skipton Castle The Earl of Cumberland to the Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland. Forwards letters.

October 31, 1635 (1). Whitehall. The Council to the Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties [i.e. the Earl of Cumberland] Order for muster rolls

July —, 1635. Arundel House. Four Lords Lieutenants to the Deputy Lieutenants of tlte county of Cumberland Order for muster¬rolls.

April 27, 1635. Whitchall. The Council to the Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties. Order for a muster

May 31, 1633. Same place. The same to the same. Concerning the cost of the muster.

July —, 1633. Arundel House. Two Lords Lieutenants to the Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland Concerning the march to be used by the English nation.

March 10, 1635 (?). Whitehall. The Council to the Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties. Concerning the measure to be taken by all English drummers

March 24. 1636 [-7?] Same place. The same to the same. Order for a muster.

May 20, 1637. London. The Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties to the Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland Order for a muster.

August 17 1637. Whitehall. The Council to the Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties. Order for the replenishment of the magazines with gunpowder, and for the exercise of the trained bands where there is not the infection of the plague.

September 7, 1637. Kirkby Thore. Lord Clifford to the Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland. Order for a muster.

[September, 1637.] Sir Patricius Curwen and William Pennington to Lord William Howard. Concerning the proposed muster.

October 20, 1637. Cockermouth Castle. The Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland to the Lord Lieutenant of the northern counties. They cannot give an exact account, by reason of the many late taxations and the sickness at Newcastle, from whence they should have obtained necessaries for the magazines.

January 8, 1637 [-8 7] Muncaster William Pennington to Lord Wil¬liam Howard. There has been of late much stealth of sheep in these park, so that many have lost a fourth part of their flocks, others a third, and some one half. If some speedy course be not taken, we shall he in a worse case than the borders. The thieves seldom take above one or two sheep at a time. It is thought that they bestow the flesh under¬ground or in some other secret place. The pelts, after pulling them, they throw away, and the bones they burn. If they chance to be taken, there is nothing to be found with them but suet, or wool. Though they have no sheep or goods of their own, they fare as well on this trade as those who have good farms. This country stands altogether upon the flocks of sheep. Abraham Singleton, a notorious thief, is now in prison.

August 31 [1639]. Canterbury. Nomination of the Earl of Arundel and Surrey, and Lord Maltravers, as Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland.

February 26, 1639 [-40]. Nomination of Deputy Lieutenants of the county of Cumberland.

ND. Order by the Earl of Northumberland, Lord General, for the levy of forty footmen for the garrison of Berwick.

August 22, 1640. Carlisle. Thomas Alcocke, Serjeant Major, to Leonard Dykes. The Scots are marching into England, to prevent whose progress the King is at York. He intends to be at the head of the army himself, my Lord General being indisposed. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland is declared Lord General. This I have from Sir Henry Vane, who has ordered me to write to him this night at York.

August 24, 1640. Same place. The same to the same. Since writing to you on Saturday, I have received another letter from Sir Henry Vane, to require to raise the trained bands and all other forces, to resist the progress of the enemy. I have written to Sir Patricius Curwen and Capt. Pennington.

A table of the men, muskets, and pikes, to be provided by t.he several townships in Allerdale Ward, according to the appointment of Sir Patricius Curwen, Sir Milliam Musgrave, and Leonard Dykes, Deputy Lieutenants. Total 236 men, 160 muskets, 76 pikes.

December 7, 1640. H. Elsynge, clerk of the House of Commons, to the Justices of the Peace in the county of Cumberland. Order to present the names of all recusants.

December 20, 1640. Carlisle. (Sir) Thomas Dacre, Peter Senhouse, and Leonard Dykes to the High Constables in Allerdale Ward. Order to present the names of all reusants.

Whitsuntide, 1710. Inventory of goods [at. Muncaster Castle]. One of the rooms is described as “King Harry Room,” in allusion to the visit of Henry VI.

(17th century.) List of able bodied men at Muncaster, 51; at Cornay, 19; at Bootle, 7; at Wayberthwaite, 33; at Drigg and Carleton, 43.

November 9, 1637. Sir Thomas Dacre, Sheriff of Cumberland, to Joseph Patrickson, gent., collector of the ship-money in Allerdale Warl above Darwent. Order for the levy and distraint of the sums assessed.

November 6, 1637. Assessment of ship-money in Allerdale Ward above Darwin.

September 18 [1610]. Carlisle. Sir William Howard, Sir George Dalston, and Sir Thomas Dacre to the High Constable of Allerdala Ward beneath Darwen. We understand that the Scots are preparing to invade this county, and to deal with it as they have done with Northumberland and the Bishopric of Durham. The landlords of your division are to appear at Carlisle on the 22nd inst. with such men as are under their command, with arms offensive and defensive, and seven days’ provision for every man. All such as were dragooners under Sir Charles Howard in Holm Cultram are likewise commanded to appear with their arms on the day and at the place aforesaid.

September 28, 1640. Carlisle. Orders issued by the Deputy Lieu¬tenants and Justices of the Peace.
(1) That a general muster be forth¬with taken by the landlords, that one able. man out of every five be chosen to defend the country, and that the four who stay at home shall provide arms and allowance;
(2) That all freeholders shall come themselves or send an able man with arms and allowance, excepting the trained bands of horse and foot. in regard of their more immediate service. That the rendezvous shall be at Carlisle on Wednesday next;
(3) That the country in general shall contribute towards the charges of making such works as shall be thought necessary by the Lieutenant Governor for the defence of the city;
(4) That upon the firing of the beacons all the men chosen shall repair to Carlisle, with seven days’ provision, upon pain of death.

Supplementary orders by Leonard I)ykes and Thomas Alcock, that every soldier shall bring with him, besides his arms, a spade, shovel, or pickaxe, to the rendezvous at Carlisle, from whence they shall be carried in carts to the places at which they will be used.

July 6, 1639. Workington. Sir Patricius Curwen and Peter Sen¬house to the constables of Embleton Wythop (Widhope), and Set¬murthey (Sackmurder). Order for the billet of one hundred and sixty soldiers in Roseley, Westward, and other adjoining places.

July 5, 1639. Same place. The same to the constables of Isell, Sunderland, Old Park, and Bewaldeth. Order for the billet of the company of Serjeant Bray.

November 8. 1642. Note of William Pennington’s subscription of 101., for the defence of the county of Cumberland.

The volume also contains some farm accounts of the eighteenth century.

A folio volume of the seventeenth century. letteredi “Sir John Pen¬nington’s Journal.” It contains the smooth log, or fair transcript of the journal kept on board the successive ships of the royal navy which were under his command in the years 1631, 1633, 1634, 1635, and 1636. Besides a daily record of the wind and weather, it gives an account of the events of each day, and many particulars illustrative of nautical life. The entries are so terse that I have seldom attempted to abbre¬viate them in the following extracts

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